Suture neontology and paleontology: The bases for where, when and how boundaries between bones have been established and have evolved

Michael J. Depew, Claudia Compagnucci, John Griffin

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

Much of what has been written about sutures has either focused on the genetic and biologic etiologies of specific sutural development, maintenance, and pathogenesis or on the utilization of sutures as character states in vertebrate cladistic analyses. There is a much more modest literature explicitly concerned with the evolution of sutures. We provide a small bridge of these literatures by presenting a discussion of the evolutionary biologic bases for the patterns of where, when, and how sutural boundaries between skeletal and dental elements have been established and have evolved. As sutural boundaries do not exist in the absence of the nucleation events that initiate the generation of skeletal elements, we explore historic models seeking to identify the inductive events dictating the specific times and places where a cranial skeletal element forms, the elaboration of its sutural boundaries, and the mechanisms whereby subsequent phyletic changes may be manifested and recognized.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationFrontiers of Oral Biology
Pages57-78
Number of pages22
Volume12
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2008

Publication series

NameFrontiers of Oral Biology
Volume12
ISSN (Print)14202433
ISSN (Electronic)16623770

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Otorhinolaryngology
  • Dentistry (miscellaneous)
  • Medicine(all)

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    Depew, M. J., Compagnucci, C., & Griffin, J. (2008). Suture neontology and paleontology: The bases for where, when and how boundaries between bones have been established and have evolved. In Frontiers of Oral Biology (Vol. 12, pp. 57-78). (Frontiers of Oral Biology; Vol. 12). https://doi.org/10.1159/000115032