Sweet-beverage consumption and risk of pancreatic cancer in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC)

Eva M. Navarrete-Muñoz, Petra A. Wark, Dora Romaguera, Nirmala Bhoo-Pathy, Dominique Michaud, Esther Molina-Montes, Anne Tjønneland, Anja Olsen, Kim Overvad, Marie Christine Boutron-Ruault, Françoise Clavel-Chapelon, Guy Fagherazzi, Verena A. Katzke, Tilman Kühn, Annika Steffen, Antonia Trichopoulou, Eleni Klinaki, Eleni Maria Papatesta, Giovanna Masala, Vittorio KroghRosario Tumino, Alessio Naccarati, Amalia Mattiello, Petra H. Peeters, Charlotta Rylander, Christine L. Parr, Guri Skeie, Elisabete Weiderpass, J. Ramón Quirós, Eric J. Duell, Miren Dorronsoro, José María Huerta, Eva Ardanaz, Nick Wareham, Kay Tee Khaw, Ruth C. Travis, Tim Key, Magdalena Stepien, Heinz Freisling, Elio Riboli, H. Bas Bueno-De-mesquita

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: The consumption of sweet beverages has been associated with greater risk of type 2 diabetes and obesity, which may be involved in the development of pancreatic cancer. Therefore, it has been hypothesized that sweet beverages may increase pancreatic cancer risk as well. Objective: We examined the association between sweet-beverage consumption (including total, sugar-sweetened, and artificially sweetened soft drink and juice and nectar consumption) and pancreatic cancer risk. Design: The study was conducted within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition cohort. A total of 477,199 participants (70.2% women) with a mean age of 51 y at baselinenot associated with pancreatic cancer risk. Juice and nectar consumption was inversely associated with pancreatic cancer risk (HR per 100 g/d: 0.91; 95% CI: 0.84, 0.99); this association remained statistically significant after adjustment for body size, type 2 diabetes, and energy intake. Conclusions: Soft-drink consumption does not seem to be associated with pancreatic cancer risk. Juice and nectar consumption might be associated with a modest decreased pancreatic cancer risk. Additional studies with specific information on juice and nectar subtypes are warranted to clarify these results. Am J Clin Nutr 2016;104:760-8.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)760-768
Number of pages9
JournalAmerican Journal of Clinical Nutrition
Volume104
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sep 1 2016

Keywords

  • Epidemiology
  • Juice and nectar
  • Pancreatic cancer
  • Prevention
  • Risk factors
  • Soft drinks
  • Sugary drinks
  • Sweet beverages

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Nutrition and Dietetics

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  • Cite this

    Navarrete-Muñoz, E. M., Wark, P. A., Romaguera, D., Bhoo-Pathy, N., Michaud, D., Molina-Montes, E., Tjønneland, A., Olsen, A., Overvad, K., Boutron-Ruault, M. C., Clavel-Chapelon, F., Fagherazzi, G., Katzke, V. A., Kühn, T., Steffen, A., Trichopoulou, A., Klinaki, E., Papatesta, E. M., Masala, G., ... Bueno-De-mesquita, H. B. (2016). Sweet-beverage consumption and risk of pancreatic cancer in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC). American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 104(3), 760-768. https://doi.org/10.3945/ajcn.116.130963