Switch therapy in full-term neonates with presumed or proven bacterial infection

Paolo Manzoni, S. Esposito, E. Gallo, L. Gastaldo, D. Farina, N. Principi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

This case-control study of full-term newborns with presumed or proven bacterial infection compared the efficacy, safety and tolerability of switch antibiotic therapy and traditional completely intravenous antibiotic administration. There were 36 newborns treated with switch therapy (i.v. ampicillin + sulbactam combined with i.v. amikacin for 3 days followed by oral cefpodoxime proxetil for 5 days); there were 72 full-term newborns with the same characteristics as controls who received i.v. ampicillin + sulbactam combined with i.v. amikacin for 3 days followed by i.v. ampicillin + sulbactam alone for a further 5 days. The results showed that full-term newborns with presumed or proven bacterial infection initially treated with intravenous antibiotics can be switched to oral antibiotics after 3 days' therapy if physical and laboratory data indicate the disappearance of infection, thus significantly reducing the length of stay in the neonatal intensive care unit and significantly increasing breastfeeding, without having any negative clinical impact.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)68-73
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Chemotherapy
Volume21
Issue number1
Publication statusPublished - 2009

Fingerprint

Bacterial Infections
Anti-Bacterial Agents
cefpodoxime proxetil
Amikacin
Neonatal Intensive Care Units
Therapeutics
Breast Feeding
Intravenous Administration
Case-Control Studies
Length of Stay
Safety
Infection
sultamicillin

Keywords

  • Antibiotic therapy
  • Bacterial infection
  • Cefpodoxime proxetil
  • Neonatal infections
  • Newborns
  • Switch therapy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pharmacology (medical)
  • Infectious Diseases
  • Oncology
  • Pharmacology

Cite this

Manzoni, P., Esposito, S., Gallo, E., Gastaldo, L., Farina, D., & Principi, N. (2009). Switch therapy in full-term neonates with presumed or proven bacterial infection. Journal of Chemotherapy, 21(1), 68-73.

Switch therapy in full-term neonates with presumed or proven bacterial infection. / Manzoni, Paolo; Esposito, S.; Gallo, E.; Gastaldo, L.; Farina, D.; Principi, N.

In: Journal of Chemotherapy, Vol. 21, No. 1, 2009, p. 68-73.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Manzoni, P, Esposito, S, Gallo, E, Gastaldo, L, Farina, D & Principi, N 2009, 'Switch therapy in full-term neonates with presumed or proven bacterial infection', Journal of Chemotherapy, vol. 21, no. 1, pp. 68-73.
Manzoni P, Esposito S, Gallo E, Gastaldo L, Farina D, Principi N. Switch therapy in full-term neonates with presumed or proven bacterial infection. Journal of Chemotherapy. 2009;21(1):68-73.
Manzoni, Paolo ; Esposito, S. ; Gallo, E. ; Gastaldo, L. ; Farina, D. ; Principi, N. / Switch therapy in full-term neonates with presumed or proven bacterial infection. In: Journal of Chemotherapy. 2009 ; Vol. 21, No. 1. pp. 68-73.
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