Fattori nervosi simpatici, variabilita pressoria e danno d'organo nell'ipertensione arteriosa

Translated title of the contribution: Sympathetic neural factors, blood pressure variability and end-organ damage in hypertension

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Animal models have shown that hypertension may be accompanied by an increase in sympathetic activity. The findings of increased plasma norepinephrine or increased muscle sympathetic nerve traffic have now provided clear evidence, however, that sympathetic activity is increased in essential hypertension and that adrenergic neural mechanisms are already involved in the early phase of this condition. Furthermore, in the early and late phases of hypertension, the presence of other cardiovascular risk factors frequently accompanying hypertension such as obesity, insulin- resistance, and smoking, concomitant with hypertension, brings about sympathetic activation which may be superimposed on the activation resulting from the hypertensive state itself. Finally, sympathetic activation is directly involved in the progression of end-organ damage and plays a paramount role in the cardiovascular structural changes typical of the blood pressure elevation occurring in left ventricular hypertrophy, arteriolar remodeling, and atherosclerosis. These findings underscore the importance of aiming anti-hypertensive treatment at the reduction not only of blood pressure levels, but also of enhanced sympathetic cardiovascular drive.

Translated title of the contributionSympathetic neural factors, blood pressure variability and end-organ damage in hypertension
Original languageItalian
Pages (from-to)217-222
Number of pages6
JournalAnnali Italiani di Medicina Interna
Volume12
Issue number4
Publication statusPublished - 1997

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Internal Medicine

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