Systemic lupus erythematosus: Old and new susceptibility genes versus clinical manifestations

J. De Azevêdo Silva, C. Addobbati, P. Sandrin-Garcia, S. Crovella

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

24 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE) is one of the most relevant world-wide autoimmune disorders. The formation of autoantibodies and the deposition of antibody-containing immune complexes in blood vessels throughout the body is the main pathogenic mechanism of SLE leading to heterogeneous clinical manifestations and target tissue damage. The complexity of etiology and pathogenesis in SLE, enclosing genetic and environmental factors, apparently is one of the greatest challenges for both researchers and clinicians. Strong indications for a genetic background in SLE come from studies in families as well as in monozygotic and dizygotic twins, discovering several SLE-associated loci and genes (e.g. IRF5, PTPN22, CTLA4, STAT4 and BANK1). As SLE has a complex genetic background, none of these genes is likely to be entirely responsible for triggering autoimmune response in SLE even if they disclosure a potentially novel molecular mechanisms in the pathogenesis' disease. The clinical manifestations and disease severity varies greatly among patients, thus several studies try to associate clinical heterogeneity and prognosis with specific genetic polymorphisms in SLE associated genes. The continue effort to describe new predisposing or modulating genes in SLE is justified by the limited knowledge about the pathogenesis, assorted clinical manifestation and the possible prevention strategies. In this review we describe newly discovered, as well as the most studied genes associated to SLE susceptibility, and relate them to clinical manifestations of the disease.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)52-65
Number of pages14
JournalCurrent Genomics
Volume15
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014

Fingerprint

Systemic Lupus Erythematosus
Genes
Dizygotic Twins
Monozygotic Twins
Disclosure
Genetic Polymorphisms
Antigen-Antibody Complex
Autoimmunity
Autoantibodies
Blood Vessels
Research Personnel
Antibodies

Keywords

  • Autoimmunity
  • B cells
  • Clinical manifestations
  • DSBs
  • IFN
  • SLE
  • SNPs
  • T cells

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Genetics
  • Genetics(clinical)

Cite this

Systemic lupus erythematosus : Old and new susceptibility genes versus clinical manifestations. / De Azevêdo Silva, J.; Addobbati, C.; Sandrin-Garcia, P.; Crovella, S.

In: Current Genomics, Vol. 15, No. 1, 2014, p. 52-65.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

De Azevêdo Silva, J. ; Addobbati, C. ; Sandrin-Garcia, P. ; Crovella, S. / Systemic lupus erythematosus : Old and new susceptibility genes versus clinical manifestations. In: Current Genomics. 2014 ; Vol. 15, No. 1. pp. 52-65.
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