T Cell-Depleted and T Cell-Replete HLA-Haploidentical Stem Cell Transplantation for Non-malignant Disorders

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

Abstract

Purpose of Review: Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is a treatment option for children with malignant and non-malignant disorders as well as an expanding number of inherited disorders. However, only a limited portion of patients in the need of an allograft have an HLA-compatible, either related or unrelated, donor. Haploidentical HSCT is now considered a valid treatment option, especially in view of the recent insights in terms of graft manipulation. This review will offer an overview of clinical results obtained through the use of haploidentical HSCT in non-malignant diseases. We will analyze major advantages and drawbacks of both T cell depleted and unmanipulated HSCT, discussing future challenges for further improving patients’ outcome. Recent Findings: T cell depletion (TCD) aims to reduce the morbidity and mortality associated with graft-versus-host disease (GvHD). However, the delayed immune recovery and the risk of graft failure still remain potential problems. In the last years, the use of post-transplant cyclophosphamide has been shown to be an alternative effective strategy to prevent GvHD in recipients of haploidentical HSCT. Summary: Recent data suggest that both T cell depleted and T cell-replete haplo-HSCT are suitable options to treat children with several types of non-malignant disorders lacking an HLA-identical donor.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)68-78
Number of pages11
JournalCurrent Hematologic Malignancy Reports
Volume12
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 1 2017

Keywords

  • Graft-versus-host disease
  • Haploidentical stem cell transplantation
  • Immune recovery
  • Non-malignant disorders
  • T cell depletion

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Hematology
  • Oncology
  • Cancer Research

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