T-cell receptor gene rearrangements as markers of lineage and clonality in T-cell neoplasms

F. Flug, P. G. Pelicci, F. Bonetti, D. M. Knowles, R. Dalla-Favera

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167 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Ig gene rearrangements represent markers of lineage, clonality, and differentiation of B cells, allowing a molecular diagnosis and immunogenotypic classification of B-cell neoplasms. We sought to apply a similar approach to the study of T-cell populations by analyzing rearrangements of the T-cell receptor β-chain (T(β)) gene. Our analysis, by Southern blotting hybridization using T(β)-specific probes of DNAs from polyclonal T cells and from 12 T-cell tumors, indicates that T(β) gene rearrangement patterns can be used as markers of (i) lineage, allowing the identification of polyclonal T-cell populations, and (ii) clonality, allowing the detection of monoclonal T-cell tumors. In addition, our data indicate that T(β) gene rearrangements represent early and general markers of T-cell differentiation since they are detectable in histologically different tumors at all stages of T-cell development. The ability to determine lineage, clonality, and stage of differentiation has significant implications for future experimental and clinical studies on normal and neoplastic T cells.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)3460-3464
Number of pages5
JournalProceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
Volume82
Issue number10
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1985

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T-Lymphocyte Gene Rearrangement
T-Cell Receptor Genes
T-Lymphocytes
Gene Rearrangement
Neoplasms
B-Lymphocytes
Immunoglobulin Genes
DNA Probes
T-Cell Antigen Receptor
Southern Blotting
Population
Cell Differentiation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Genetics
  • General

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T-cell receptor gene rearrangements as markers of lineage and clonality in T-cell neoplasms. / Flug, F.; Pelicci, P. G.; Bonetti, F.; Knowles, D. M.; Dalla-Favera, R.

In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, Vol. 82, No. 10, 1985, p. 3460-3464.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AU - Pelicci, P. G.

AU - Bonetti, F.

AU - Knowles, D. M.

AU - Dalla-Favera, R.

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