T lymphocytes of recipient origin may contribute to the recovery of specific immune response toward viruses and fungi in children undergoing cord blood transplantation

Daniela Montagna, Franco Locatelli, Antonia Moretta, Daniela Lisini, Carlo Previderè, Pierangela Grignani, Piero DeStefano, Giovanna Giorgiani, Enrica Montini, Sara Pagani, Patrizia Comoli, Rita Maccario

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Patients undergoing allogeneic cord blood transplantation (CBT) benefit from a low risk of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), but there are still concerns that they be able to recover an effective immune capacity early after transplantation. We investigated the ability to develop in vitro T-lymphocyte-mediated immune response toward human cytomegalovirus and Candida albicans antigens, early and late after transplantation, in children given cord blood transplants from either an HLA-identical sibling or an unrelated donor. Proliferative capacity and frequency of antigen-specific T cells were evaluated; antigen-specific CD4+ T-cell clones were also generated and characterized for T-cell receptor repertoire diversity, cytokine phenotype, and their origin (either from donor or patient). We found that the majority of recipients can develop a specific response to viral or fungal antigens already early after transplantation. Antigen-specific T-cell clones of both donor and recipient origin contributed to the reconstitution of immune response. Antigen-specific T lymphocytes of recipient origin were detected in patients receiving a transplant from a relative, after a chemotherapy-based conditioning regimen, and who did not have GVHD. Our results document, at a clonal level, that after CBT recovery of either polyclonal or pauciclonal T-cell response toward widespread pathogens is prompt, with some patients benefiting from a contribution of recipient-derived cells.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)4322-4329
Number of pages8
JournalBlood
Volume103
Issue number11
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 1 2004

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T-cells
Fungi
Fetal Blood
Viruses
Blood
Transplantation
T-Lymphocytes
Recovery
Antigens
Transplants
Graft vs Host Disease
Grafts
Fungal Antigens
Clone Cells
Tissue Donors
Transplantation (surgical)
Unrelated Donors
CD4 Antigens
Aptitude
Chemotherapy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Hematology

Cite this

T lymphocytes of recipient origin may contribute to the recovery of specific immune response toward viruses and fungi in children undergoing cord blood transplantation. / Montagna, Daniela; Locatelli, Franco; Moretta, Antonia; Lisini, Daniela; Previderè, Carlo; Grignani, Pierangela; DeStefano, Piero; Giorgiani, Giovanna; Montini, Enrica; Pagani, Sara; Comoli, Patrizia; Maccario, Rita.

In: Blood, Vol. 103, No. 11, 01.06.2004, p. 4322-4329.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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