Tactile event-related potentials in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS)

Implications for brain-computer interface

S. Silvoni, L. Konicar, M. A. Prats-Sedano, E. Garcia-Cossio, C. Genna, C. Volpato, M. Cavinato, A. Paggiaro, S. Veser, D. De Massari, N. Birbaumer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: We investigated neurophysiological brain responses elicited by a tactile event-related potential paradigm in a sample of ALS patients. Underlying cognitive processes and neurophysiological signatures for brain-computer interface (BCI) are addressed. Methods: We stimulated the palm of the hand in a group of fourteen ALS patients and a control group of ten healthy participants and recorded electroencephalographic signals in eyes-closed condition. Target and non-target brain responses were analyzed and classified offline. Classification errors served as the basis for neurophysiological brain response sub-grouping. Results: A combined behavioral and quantitative neurophysiological analysis of sub-grouped data showed neither significant between-group differences, nor significant correlations between classification performance and the ALS patients' clinical state. Taking sequential effects of stimuli presentation into account, analyses revealed mean classification errors of 19.4% and 24.3% in healthy participants and ALS patients respectively. Conclusions: Neurophysiological correlates of tactile stimuli presentation are not altered by ALS. Tactile event-related potentials can be used to monitor attention level and task performance in ALS and may constitute a viable basis for future BCIs. Significance: Implications for brain-computer interface implementation of the proposed method for patients in critical conditions, such as the late stage of ALS and the (completely) locked-in state, are discussed.

Original languageEnglish
JournalClinical Neurophysiology
DOIs
Publication statusAccepted/In press - 2015

Fingerprint

Brain-Computer Interfaces
Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis
Touch
Evoked Potentials
Healthy Volunteers
Brain
Task Performance and Analysis
Hand
Control Groups

Keywords

  • (Partially) locked-in syndrome
  • Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS)
  • Brain-computer interface (BCI)
  • Single-trial analysis
  • Tactile event-related potentials

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Neurology
  • Physiology (medical)
  • Sensory Systems

Cite this

Tactile event-related potentials in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) : Implications for brain-computer interface. / Silvoni, S.; Konicar, L.; Prats-Sedano, M. A.; Garcia-Cossio, E.; Genna, C.; Volpato, C.; Cavinato, M.; Paggiaro, A.; Veser, S.; De Massari, D.; Birbaumer, N.

In: Clinical Neurophysiology, 2015.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Silvoni, S. ; Konicar, L. ; Prats-Sedano, M. A. ; Garcia-Cossio, E. ; Genna, C. ; Volpato, C. ; Cavinato, M. ; Paggiaro, A. ; Veser, S. ; De Massari, D. ; Birbaumer, N. / Tactile event-related potentials in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) : Implications for brain-computer interface. In: Clinical Neurophysiology. 2015.
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abstract = "Objective: We investigated neurophysiological brain responses elicited by a tactile event-related potential paradigm in a sample of ALS patients. Underlying cognitive processes and neurophysiological signatures for brain-computer interface (BCI) are addressed. Methods: We stimulated the palm of the hand in a group of fourteen ALS patients and a control group of ten healthy participants and recorded electroencephalographic signals in eyes-closed condition. Target and non-target brain responses were analyzed and classified offline. Classification errors served as the basis for neurophysiological brain response sub-grouping. Results: A combined behavioral and quantitative neurophysiological analysis of sub-grouped data showed neither significant between-group differences, nor significant correlations between classification performance and the ALS patients' clinical state. Taking sequential effects of stimuli presentation into account, analyses revealed mean classification errors of 19.4{\%} and 24.3{\%} in healthy participants and ALS patients respectively. Conclusions: Neurophysiological correlates of tactile stimuli presentation are not altered by ALS. Tactile event-related potentials can be used to monitor attention level and task performance in ALS and may constitute a viable basis for future BCIs. Significance: Implications for brain-computer interface implementation of the proposed method for patients in critical conditions, such as the late stage of ALS and the (completely) locked-in state, are discussed.",
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