Tailoring hemostatic therapies to lower inhibitor development in previously untreated patients with severe hemophilia A

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Abstract

Summary: After technological progress provided safer therapeutic products for patients with hemophilia A, the development of alloantibodies (inhibitors) neutralizing the coagulant activity of infused factor VIII (FVIII) remains the most serious complication of replacement therapy, predisposing patients to greater morbidity and causing higher treatment costs. The pathogenesis of inhibitors, which develop at a high rate in previously untreated children with severe hemophilia A, is multifactorial, resulting from complex interactions between genetic and environmental factors. Among non-genetic determinants, a key role is played by treatment-related factors, including the source of FVIII product (i.e., plasma derived or recombinant) and the mode of replacement therapy delivery (i.e., intensity, prophylaxis vs. on demand). We review the potential interventions on these modifiable factors that may help to lower the rate of inhibitor development. In addition, interest is currently directed toward the potential for lesser immunogenicity of novel hemostatic agents designed to decrease the dosing frequency or avoid/delay the need of FVIII replacement therapy.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1330-1336
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Thrombosis and Haemostasis
Volume14
Issue number7
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 1 2016

Keywords

  • factor VIII
  • inhibitors
  • prevention
  • prophylaxis
  • therapy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Hematology

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