Targeting 2.5 versus 4 g/kg/day of amino acids for extremely low birth weight infants: A randomized clinical trial

Ilaria Burattini, Maria Paola Bellagamba, Cristina Spagnoli, Rita D'Ascenzo, Nadia Mazzoni, Anna Peretti, Paola E. Cogo, Virgilio P. Carnielli

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Objective To compare the effect of 2.5 vs 4 g/kg/d of amino acid (AA) in parenteral nutrition of extremely low birth weight infants on metabolic tolerance, short-term growth, and neurodevelopment. Study design One hundred thirty-one infants with birth weight between 500 and 1249 g were randomized to 2.5 (standard AA [SAA] group) or 4 (high AA [HAA] group) g/kg/d AA intake, with equal nonprotein energy. The primary outcome was body size at 36 weeks. Results One hundred thirty-one patients were randomized and 114 analyzed (58 SAA group and 56 HAA group). Study groups had similar demographics and clinical characteristics. Elevated blood urea (BU >70 mg/dL = BU nitrogen >32.6 mg/dL) occurred in 24% vs 59% (P =.000) and hyperglycemia (>175 mg/dL) in 34% vs 11% (P =.003) of the SAA and HAA patients, respectively. Body weight, length, and head circumference at 36 weeks and 2 years were similar between groups. Bayley Scales of Infant and Toddler Development, Third Edition score was 94 ± 13 in the SAA group and 97 ± 15 in the HAA group (P =.35). Conclusions The HAA group had higher BU levels and better glucose control. An extra 8 g/kg of AA over the first 10 days of life did not improve growth and neurodevelopment.

Original languageEnglish
JournalJournal of Pediatrics
Volume163
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Nov 2013

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

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