Technetium-99m-labelled red blood cell imaging in the diagnosis of hepatic haemangiomas: The role of SPECT/CT with a hybrid camera

Orazio Schillaci, Roberta Danieli, Carlo Manni, Francesca Capoccetti, Giovanni Simonetti

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

33 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Delayed liver single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) after 99mTc red blood cell (RBC) labelling is helpful in detecting hepatic haemangiomas; however, diagnosis can be difficult when lesions are situated adjacent to structures like the inferior vena cava, the heart or hepatic vessels, where blood activity persists. The aims of this study were to evaluate the usefulness of RBC SPECT and transmission computed tomography (RBC SPECT/CT) performed simultaneously with a hybrid imaging system for correct characterisation of hepatic lesions in patients with suspected haemangioma, and to assess the additional value of fused images compared with SPECT alone. Twelve patients with 24 liver lesions were studied. The acquisitions of both anatomical (CT) and functional (SPECT) data were performed during a single session. SPECT images were first interpreted alone and then re-evaluated after adding the transmission anatomical maps. Image fusion was successful in all patients, with perfect correspondence between SPECT and CT data, allowing the precise anatomical localisation of sites of increased blood pool activity. SPECT/CT had a significant impact on results in four patients (33.3%) with four lesions defined as indeterminate on SPECT images, accurately characterising the hot spot foci located near vascular structures. In conclusion, RBC SPECT/CT imaging using this hybrid SPECT/CT system is feasible and useful in the identification or exclusion of suspected hepatic haemangiomas located near regions with high vascular activity.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1011-1015
Number of pages5
JournalEuropean Journal of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging
Volume31
Issue number7
Publication statusPublished - Jul 2004

Fingerprint

Technetium
Hemangioma
Single-Photon Emission-Computed Tomography
Erythrocytes
Liver
Multimodal Imaging
Blood Vessels
X Ray Computed Tomography
Inferior Vena Cava

Keywords

  • Hepatic haemangioma
  • Hybrid imaging system
  • Image fusion
  • Labelled RBCs
  • SPECT/CT

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging
  • Radiological and Ultrasound Technology

Cite this

Technetium-99m-labelled red blood cell imaging in the diagnosis of hepatic haemangiomas : The role of SPECT/CT with a hybrid camera. / Schillaci, Orazio; Danieli, Roberta; Manni, Carlo; Capoccetti, Francesca; Simonetti, Giovanni.

In: European Journal of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Vol. 31, No. 7, 07.2004, p. 1011-1015.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Schillaci, Orazio ; Danieli, Roberta ; Manni, Carlo ; Capoccetti, Francesca ; Simonetti, Giovanni. / Technetium-99m-labelled red blood cell imaging in the diagnosis of hepatic haemangiomas : The role of SPECT/CT with a hybrid camera. In: European Journal of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging. 2004 ; Vol. 31, No. 7. pp. 1011-1015.
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