TG2 transamidating activity acts as a reostat controlling the interplay between apoptosis and autophagy

Federica Rossin, Manuela D'Eletto, Douglas MacDonald, Maria Grazia Farrace, Mauro Piacentini

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Tissue transglutaminase (TG2) activity has been implicated in inflammatory disease processes such as Celiac disease, infectious diseases, cancer, and neurodegenerative diseases, such as Huntington's disease. Furthermore, four distinct biochemical activities have been described for TG2 including protein crosslinking via transamidation, GTPase, kinase and protein disulfide isomerase activities. Although the enzyme plays a complex role in the regulation of cell death and autophagy, the molecular mechanisms and the putative biochemical activity involved in each is unclear. Therefore, the goal of the present study was to determine how TG2 modulates autophagy and/or apoptosis and which of its biochemical activities is involved in those processes. To address this question, immortalized embryonic fibroblasts obtained from TG2 knock-out mice were reconstituted with either wild-type TG2 or TG2 lacking its transamidating activity and these were subjected to different treatments to induce autophagy or apoptosis. We found that knock out of the endogenous TG2 resulted in a significant exacerbation of caspase 3 activity and PARP cleavage in MEF cells subjected to apoptotic stimuli. Interestingly, the same cells showed the accumulation of LC3 II isoform following autophagy induction. These findings strongly suggest that TG2 transamidating activity plays a protective role in the response of MEF cells to death stimuli, because the expression of the wild-type TG2, but not its transamidation inactive C277S mutant, resulted in a suppression of caspase 3 as well as PARP cleavage upon apoptosis induction. Additionally, the same mutant was unable to catalyze the final steps in autophagosome formation during autophagy. Our findings clearly indicate that the TG2 transamidating activity is the primary biochemical function involved in the physiological regulation of both apoptosis and autophagy. These data also indicate that TG2 is a key regulator of cross-talk between autophagy and apoptosis.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1793-1802
Number of pages10
JournalAmino Acids
Volume42
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - May 2012

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Keywords

  • Apoptosis
  • Autophagy
  • Transamidating activity
  • Transglutaminase 2

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry
  • Clinical Biochemistry
  • Organic Chemistry

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