The APOE gene locus in frontotemporal dementia and primary progressive aphasia

Davide Seripa, Alessandra Bizzarro, Francesco Panza, Adele Acciarri, Fabio Pellegrini, Alberto Pilotto, Carlo Masullo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Objective: To investigate the role of the apolipoprotein E (APOE) locus in frontotemporal dementia (FTD) and primary progressive aphasia (PPA). Design: Case-control study. Setting: Neurology clinic, Rome, Italy. Patients: Eighty-six patients with a clinical diagnosis of sporadic FTD, including 32 patients with a clinical diagnosis of PPA, and 99 nondemented cognitively intact control subjects. Main Outcome Measures: Genotype analysis of the 3 single-nucleotide polymorphisms rs449647, rs769446, and rs405509 in the promoter region of the APOE gene and of the 2 single-nucleotide polymorphisms rs429358 and rs7412 forming the common apoE polymorphism. Results: Significant associations with FTD were observed for genotypes rs449647 A/T (odds ratio [OR], 2.1; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.0-4.5), rs769446 T/C (OR, 4.4; 95% CI, 1.9-10.2), and APOE ε3/ε4 (OR, 4.1; 95% CI, 1.6-10.9). Significant associations with PPA were also observed for genotypes APOE ε3/ε4 (OR, 22.5; 95% CI, 1.2-229.4) and ε4/ε4 (OR, 7.5; 95% CI, 2.6-21.6). Significant associations with FTD were observed for haplotypes A-C-G-C-C (OR, 5.6; 95% CI, 1.4-21.5) and T-T-T-C-C (OR, 5.2; 95% CI, 1.1-24.0). Significant associations with PPA were also observed for haplotypes A-T-T-T-C (OR, 0.4;95% CI, 0.2-0.9) and A-T-T-C-C (OR, 5.2; 95% CI, 1.4-19.3). Conclusion: Although the physiological role of apoE in FTD and PPA needs further investigations, our results suggest an involvement of the APOE gene locus in the genetics of FTD and PPA.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)622-628
Number of pages7
JournalArchives of Neurology
Volume68
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - May 2011

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology

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