The application of virtual reality to document coping deficits after a stroke: Report of a case

Laura Mendozzi, Achille Motta, Elena Barbieri, Dario Alpini, Luigi Pugnetti

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

An immersive virtual reality (IVR) paradigm to assess cognitive flexibility and problem solving was used to document everyday life-coping failures in a patient with cognitive sequelae of an anterior left thalamic stroke. Three years after the ischemic event, the patient was showing clear signs of frontal lobe dysfunction when left unsupervised in real-life settings, yet his performance on traditional neuropsychological tests tapping frontal functions was unremarkable. We speculated, and provided evidence, that his conduct was influenced by the setting and the presence of an examiner who would strengthen his impaired ability to self-generate control over a number of higher order cognitive activities. Thanks to the immersive effect and nonverbal aspects of the interaction provided by IVR, we could document our patient's cognitive difficulties on two separate occasions. The reasons why IVR was superior to traditional tests are analyzed with reference to well-known cognitive models of the way frontal networks modulate behavior in nonroutine circumstances.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)79-91
Number of pages13
JournalCyberpsychology and Behavior
Volume1
Issue number1
Publication statusPublished - Mar 1998

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Applied Psychology
  • Communication

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'The application of virtual reality to document coping deficits after a stroke: Report of a case'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this