The autonomic phenotype of rumination

Cristina Ottaviani, David Shapiro, Dmitry M. Davydov, Iris B. Goldstein, Paul J. Mills

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

55 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Recent studies suggest that ruminative thoughts may be mediators of the prolonged physiological effects of stress. We hypothesized that autonomic dysregulation plays a role in the relation between rumination and health. Rumination was induced by an anger-recall task in 45 healthy subjects. Heart rate variability (HRV), baroreflex sensitivity (BRS), and baroreflex effectiveness index (BEI) change scores were evaluated to obtain the autonomic phenotype of rumination. Personality traits and endothelial activation were examined for their relation to autonomic responses during rumination. Degree of endothelial activation was assessed by circulating soluble intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (sICAM-1). Vagal withdrawal during rumination was greater for women than men. Larger decreases in the high frequency component of HRV were associated with higher levels of anger-in, depression, and sICAM-1 levels. BRS reactivity was negatively related to trait anxiety. BEI reactivity was positively related to anger-in, hostility, anxiety, and depression. Lower BEI and BRS recovery were associated with lower social desirability and higher anger-out, anxiety, and depression. Findings suggest that the autonomic dysregulation that characterizes rumination plays a role in the relationships between personality and cardiovascular health.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)267-275
Number of pages9
JournalInternational Journal of Psychophysiology
Volume72
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 2009

Fingerprint

Baroreflex
Anger
Phenotype
Anxiety
Intercellular Adhesion Molecule-1
Depression
Personality
Heart Rate
Social Desirability
Hostility
Health
Healthy Volunteers

Keywords

  • Baroreflex
  • Endothelium
  • Heart rate variability
  • Rumination

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)
  • Physiology (medical)
  • Neuropsychology and Physiological Psychology

Cite this

Ottaviani, C., Shapiro, D., Davydov, D. M., Goldstein, I. B., & Mills, P. J. (2009). The autonomic phenotype of rumination. International Journal of Psychophysiology, 72(3), 267-275. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ijpsycho.2008.12.014

The autonomic phenotype of rumination. / Ottaviani, Cristina; Shapiro, David; Davydov, Dmitry M.; Goldstein, Iris B.; Mills, Paul J.

In: International Journal of Psychophysiology, Vol. 72, No. 3, 06.2009, p. 267-275.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Ottaviani, C, Shapiro, D, Davydov, DM, Goldstein, IB & Mills, PJ 2009, 'The autonomic phenotype of rumination', International Journal of Psychophysiology, vol. 72, no. 3, pp. 267-275. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ijpsycho.2008.12.014
Ottaviani C, Shapiro D, Davydov DM, Goldstein IB, Mills PJ. The autonomic phenotype of rumination. International Journal of Psychophysiology. 2009 Jun;72(3):267-275. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ijpsycho.2008.12.014
Ottaviani, Cristina ; Shapiro, David ; Davydov, Dmitry M. ; Goldstein, Iris B. ; Mills, Paul J. / The autonomic phenotype of rumination. In: International Journal of Psychophysiology. 2009 ; Vol. 72, No. 3. pp. 267-275.
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