The benefits of hepatitis C virus cure: Every rose has thorns

The ESCMID Study Group for Viral Hepatitis

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

To examine mid-term benefits on hepatic complications, extrahepatic clinical syndromes and quality of life associated with HCV cure; to review the few safety issues linked to oral direct-acting antivirals (DAAs); and to discuss the potential population benefits of reducing the burden of HCV infection. DAAs cure HCV infection in more than 95% of patients. The halting of liver inflammation and fibrosis progression translates into both hepatic and extrahepatic benefits and reduces the need for liver transplantation. A reduction in the frequency of extrahepatic manifestations such as mixed cryoglobulinaemia and vasculitis and improvements in quality of life and fatigue have also been described. A few safety issues linked to DAAs such as the potential recurrence of aggressive HCC, the flares of hepatitis B virus in patients with overt or occult HBV infection are been discussed. Curing HCV infection also has a high potential to reduce the burden of HCV infection at the population level. With widespread scaling up of HCV treatment, several modeling studies suggest that major reductions in HCV prevalence and incidence are possible, and that elimination of viral hepatitis is an achievable target by 2030.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)320-328
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Viral Hepatitis
Volume25
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 1 2018

Fingerprint

Hepacivirus
Antiviral Agents
Infection
Quality of Life
Safety
Cryoglobulinemia
Liver
Vasculitis
Hepatitis B virus
Liver Cirrhosis
Liver Transplantation
Hepatitis
Population
Fatigue
Inflammation
Recurrence
Incidence
Therapeutics

Keywords

  • end-stage liver disease
  • hepatitis C virus
  • hepatocellular carcinoma
  • sustained virological response

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Hepatology
  • Infectious Diseases
  • Virology

Cite this

The benefits of hepatitis C virus cure : Every rose has thorns. / The ESCMID Study Group for Viral Hepatitis.

In: Journal of Viral Hepatitis, Vol. 25, No. 4, 01.04.2018, p. 320-328.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

The ESCMID Study Group for Viral Hepatitis 2018, 'The benefits of hepatitis C virus cure: Every rose has thorns' Journal of Viral Hepatitis, vol. 25, no. 4, pp. 320-328. https://doi.org/10.1111/jvh.12823
The ESCMID Study Group for Viral Hepatitis. / The benefits of hepatitis C virus cure : Every rose has thorns. In: Journal of Viral Hepatitis. 2018 ; Vol. 25, No. 4. pp. 320-328.
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