The Categorical Organization of Semantic and Lexical Knowledge in the Brain

Guido Gainotti

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

28 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In recent years several papers have shown that different verbal and non-verbal semantic categories can be selectively disrupted by brain damage and that consistent anatomical localizations correspond to each category-specific semantic disorder. This paper aims to suggest that the brain regions typically damaged in a given type of category-specific semantic disorder might be critically involved in processing the kind of information which mainly contributes to organizing that semantic category and to distinguishing among its members. This general hypothesis is discussed taking into account: (a) comprehension and production of object names (nouns) and of action names (verbs) in agrammatic and in anomic aphasic patients; (b) verbal and non-verbal identification of body parts; (c) verbal and non-verbal identification of living beings and of man made artefacts.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)109-115
Number of pages7
JournalBehavioural Neurology
Volume3
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1990

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Semantics
Organizations
Brain
Names
Automatic Data Processing
Human Body
Artifacts

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Neurology
  • Neuropsychology and Physiological Psychology

Cite this

The Categorical Organization of Semantic and Lexical Knowledge in the Brain. / Gainotti, Guido.

In: Behavioural Neurology, Vol. 3, No. 2, 1990, p. 109-115.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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