The CDC2 I-G-T haplotype associated with the APOE ε4 allele increases the risk of sporadic Alzheimer's disease in Sicily

Paolo Bosco, Filippo Caraci, Agata Copani, Rosario S. Spada, Maria Angela Sortino, Roberto Salluzzo, Michele Salemi, Ferdinando Nicoletti, Raffaele Ferri

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The cell division cycle 2 (CDC2) gene is a candidate susceptibility gene for Alzheimer's disease (AD). We investigated the CDC2 genotype, and allele and haplotype frequencies in AD patients and matched controls, distinguishing between apolipoprotein E (APOE) ε4 allele carriers and non-carriers. APOE ε4 is an established predictor of AD risk. APOE and CDC2 genotypes were examined in 109 sporadic AD patients and in 110 healthy age- and sex-matched controls from Sicily. The ε4 allele of APOE was predictive of AD risk in our study group (odds ratio: 5.37, 95% CI 2.77-10.41; P <0.0001). Genotype and allele frequencies of the three tested CDC2 polymorphisms (Ex6 + 7I/D, Ex7-15 G > A, Ex7-14 T > A) were not significantly different between AD patients and controls. However, a significant different distribution of a specific CDC2 haplotype (I-G-T) was found between AD patients and controls when analyzing APOE ε4-positive subjects (P = 0.0288). Moreover, the combined presence of the I-G-T haplotype and the ε4 allele almost doubled the risk of AD (odds ratio: 10.09, 95% CI 3.88-26.25; P <0.0001) compared to carriers of ε4 alone. This study suggests that the I-G-T haplotype of the CDC2 gene increases the risk of AD in APOE ε4 carriers.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)195-198
Number of pages4
JournalNeuroscience Letters
Volume419
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 4 2007

Keywords

  • Alzheimer's disease
  • APOE
  • cdc2
  • Cell cycle
  • Genetic polymorphism
  • Risk factor

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)

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