The centrosomal kinase NEK2 is a novel splicing factor kinase involved in cell survival

Chiara Naro, Federica Barbagallo, Paolo Chieffi, Cyril F. Bourgeois, Maria Paola Paronetto, Claudio Sette

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

NEK2 is a serine/threonine kinase that promotes centrosome splitting and ensures correct chromosome segregation during the G2/M phase of the cell cycle, through phosphorylation of specific substrates. Aberrant expression and activity of NEK2 in cancer cells lead to dysregulation of the centrosome cycle and aneuploidy. Thus, a tight regulation of NEK2 function is needed during cell cycle progression. In this study, we found that NEK2 localizes in the nucleus of cancer cells derived from several tissues. In particular, NEK2 co-localizes in splicing speckles with SRSF1 and SRSF2. Moreover, NEK2 interacts with several splicing factors and phosphorylates some of them, including the oncogenic SRSF1 protein. Overexpression of NEK2 induces phosphorylation of endogenous SR proteins and affects the splicing activity of SRSF1 toward reporter minigenes and endogenous targets, independently of SRPK1. Conversely, knockdown of NEK2, like that of SRSF1, induces expression of pro-apoptotic variants from SRSF1-target genes and sensitizes cells to apoptosis. Our results identify NEK2 as a novel splicing factor kinase and suggest that part of its oncogenic activity may be ascribed to its ability to modulate alternative splicing, a key step in gene expression regulation that is frequently altered in cancer cells.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)3218-3227
Number of pages10
JournalNucleic Acids Research
Volume42
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Genetics

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'The centrosomal kinase NEK2 is a novel splicing factor kinase involved in cell survival'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this