The communication experience of tracheostomy patients with nurses in the intensive care unit

A phenomenological study

Angela Tolotti, Annamaria Bagnasco, Gianluca Catania, Giuseppe Aleo, Nicola Pagnucci, Lucia Cadorin, Milko Zanini, Gennaro Rocco, Alessandro Stievano, Franco A. Carnevale, Loredana Sasso

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives: To describe the experience and sources of comfort and discomfort in tracheostomy patients, when they communicate with nurses in the Intensive Care Unit. Research methodology/design: Benner's interpretive phenomenology. Data were collected through: a) semi-structured interviews conducted with the patients after leaving the intensive care unit; b) participant observation; c) situated interviews with intensive care nurses. Setting: The intensive care unit of a hospital in Northern Italy. Findings: Eight patients and seven nurses were included in this study. Two main themes were identified 1) feeling powerless and frustrated due to the impossibility to use voice to communicate; 2) facing continual misunderstanding, resignation, and anger during moments of difficulty and/or communication misunderstandings. The main communication discomfort factors were: struggling with not knowing what was happening, feeling like others had given up on me, living in isolation and feeling invisible. The main comfort factors were: being with family members, feeling reassured by having a call bell nearby and nurses’ presence. Conclusions: This study highlights the important role of communication in tracheostomy patients in intensive care and how closely it is linked to all the aspects of a person's life, which cannot be underestimated as just not being able to use one's voice.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)24-31
Number of pages8
JournalIntensive and Critical Care Nursing
Volume46
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 1 2018

Fingerprint

Tracheostomy
Intensive Care Units
Emotions
Nurses
Communication
Critical Care
Research Design
Interviews
Anger
Italy
Observation

Keywords

  • Comfort
  • Communication
  • Critical care
  • Discomfort
  • Experience
  • Intensive care
  • Interpretive phenomenology
  • Nurses
  • Patient
  • Tracheostomy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Critical Care

Cite this

The communication experience of tracheostomy patients with nurses in the intensive care unit : A phenomenological study. / Tolotti, Angela; Bagnasco, Annamaria; Catania, Gianluca; Aleo, Giuseppe; Pagnucci, Nicola; Cadorin, Lucia; Zanini, Milko; Rocco, Gennaro; Stievano, Alessandro; Carnevale, Franco A.; Sasso, Loredana.

In: Intensive and Critical Care Nursing, Vol. 46, 01.06.2018, p. 24-31.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Tolotti, A, Bagnasco, A, Catania, G, Aleo, G, Pagnucci, N, Cadorin, L, Zanini, M, Rocco, G, Stievano, A, Carnevale, FA & Sasso, L 2018, 'The communication experience of tracheostomy patients with nurses in the intensive care unit: A phenomenological study', Intensive and Critical Care Nursing, vol. 46, pp. 24-31. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.iccn.2018.01.001
Tolotti, Angela ; Bagnasco, Annamaria ; Catania, Gianluca ; Aleo, Giuseppe ; Pagnucci, Nicola ; Cadorin, Lucia ; Zanini, Milko ; Rocco, Gennaro ; Stievano, Alessandro ; Carnevale, Franco A. ; Sasso, Loredana. / The communication experience of tracheostomy patients with nurses in the intensive care unit : A phenomenological study. In: Intensive and Critical Care Nursing. 2018 ; Vol. 46. pp. 24-31.
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