The control of Ca2+ homeostasis: Role of intracellular rapidly exchanging Ca2+ stores

A. Villa, J. Meldolesi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The role of rapidly exchanging intracellular Ca2+ stores in the control of Ca2+ homeostasis is reviewed. The following issues are discussed: the reasons why such stores exist in eukaryotic cells; the differences between the terminal cisternae of the skeletal muscle sarcoplasmic reticulum, which have direct, physical connection with the T tubules of the plasmalemma, and the Ca2+ stores located in the depth of the cytoplasm, which are stimulated by second messengers; the cytological nature (subcompartments of the ER) of the rapidly exchanging Ca2+ stores and their functional significance. The conclusions introduce recent developments in which intracellular Ca2+ stores have been investigated also by molecular biology techniques.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)301-307
Number of pages7
JournalCell Biology International
Volume18
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1994

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Sarcoplasmic Reticulum
Second Messenger Systems
Eukaryotic Cells
Molecular Biology
Cytoplasm
Skeletal Muscle
Homeostasis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cell Biology

Cite this

The control of Ca2+ homeostasis : Role of intracellular rapidly exchanging Ca2+ stores. / Villa, A.; Meldolesi, J.

In: Cell Biology International, Vol. 18, No. 5, 1994, p. 301-307.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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