The current practice of family-centred care in Italian neonatal intensive care units: A multicentre descriptive study

FCC Italian NICUs Study Group

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

OBJECTIVES: To explore family-centred care practices in Italian neonatal intensive care units and describe areas for improvement.

METHODS: A cross-sectional, multicentre, survey was conducted using the Italian language version of "Advancing family-centred new-born intensive care: a self-assessment inventory". The instrument is divided into 10 sections rating the status of family-centred care (1 = not at all, 5 = very well) and ranking the perceived priority for change/improvement (1 = low, 3 = high). A representative group of staff and parent for each unit were invited to complete the survey. Data was collected between January and June 2015. Correlations among unit characteristics and sections within the survey were explored.

SETTINGS: All Italian neonatal intensive care units (n = 105) were invited.

RESULTS: Forty-six (43.8%) units returned the survey. The "Leadership" section scored highest in status of family-centred care (mean = 3.45; SD 0.78) and scored highest in priority for change (mean = 2.44; SD 0.49). Section "Families as Advisors and Leaders" scored lowest both in status (mean = 1.66; SD 0.67) and in priority for change (mean = 2.09; SD 0.59). The number of discharged infants was positively correlated with many sections in priority for change (r 0.402-0.421; p < .01).

CONCLUSION: This study showed a variability in the organisation of family-centred care practices in Italian neonatal intensive care units and the need to involve parents as partners in the care team. Although family-centred care is considered important by Italian neonatology healthcare professionals, much remains to be done to improve family-centred care practices in neonatal intensive care units in Italy.

Original languageEnglish
Number of pages8
JournalIntensive and Critical Care Nursing
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - Jul 31 2018

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Family Practice
Neonatal Intensive Care Units
Multicenter Studies
Neonatology
Critical Care
Italy
Language
Cross-Sectional Studies
Parents
Organizations
Delivery of Health Care
Equipment and Supplies

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The current practice of family-centred care in Italian neonatal intensive care units : A multicentre descriptive study. / FCC Italian NICUs Study Group.

In: Intensive and Critical Care Nursing, 31.07.2018.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{e2cca4e693c04ea7bb4e8cdd5cc1f97e,
title = "The current practice of family-centred care in Italian neonatal intensive care units: A multicentre descriptive study",
abstract = "OBJECTIVES: To explore family-centred care practices in Italian neonatal intensive care units and describe areas for improvement.METHODS: A cross-sectional, multicentre, survey was conducted using the Italian language version of {"}Advancing family-centred new-born intensive care: a self-assessment inventory{"}. The instrument is divided into 10 sections rating the status of family-centred care (1 = not at all, 5 = very well) and ranking the perceived priority for change/improvement (1 = low, 3 = high). A representative group of staff and parent for each unit were invited to complete the survey. Data was collected between January and June 2015. Correlations among unit characteristics and sections within the survey were explored.SETTINGS: All Italian neonatal intensive care units (n = 105) were invited.RESULTS: Forty-six (43.8{\%}) units returned the survey. The {"}Leadership{"} section scored highest in status of family-centred care (mean = 3.45; SD 0.78) and scored highest in priority for change (mean = 2.44; SD 0.49). Section {"}Families as Advisors and Leaders{"} scored lowest both in status (mean = 1.66; SD 0.67) and in priority for change (mean = 2.09; SD 0.59). The number of discharged infants was positively correlated with many sections in priority for change (r 0.402-0.421; p < .01).CONCLUSION: This study showed a variability in the organisation of family-centred care practices in Italian neonatal intensive care units and the need to involve parents as partners in the care team. Although family-centred care is considered important by Italian neonatology healthcare professionals, much remains to be done to improve family-centred care practices in neonatal intensive care units in Italy.",
author = "{FCC Italian NICUs Study Group} and Immacolata Dall'Oglio and Rachele Mascolo and Emanuela Tiozzo and Anna Portanova and Martina Fiori and Orsola Gawronski and Andrea Dotta and Simone Piga and Caterina Offidani and Rosaria Alvaro and Gennaro Rocco and Latour, {Jos M}",
note = "Copyright {\circledC} 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.",
year = "2018",
month = "7",
day = "31",
doi = "10.1016/j.iccn.2018.07.005",
language = "English",
journal = "Intensive and Critical Care Nursing",
issn = "0964-3397",
publisher = "Churchill Livingstone",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - The current practice of family-centred care in Italian neonatal intensive care units

T2 - A multicentre descriptive study

AU - FCC Italian NICUs Study Group

AU - Dall'Oglio, Immacolata

AU - Mascolo, Rachele

AU - Tiozzo, Emanuela

AU - Portanova, Anna

AU - Fiori, Martina

AU - Gawronski, Orsola

AU - Dotta, Andrea

AU - Piga, Simone

AU - Offidani, Caterina

AU - Alvaro, Rosaria

AU - Rocco, Gennaro

AU - Latour, Jos M

N1 - Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

PY - 2018/7/31

Y1 - 2018/7/31

N2 - OBJECTIVES: To explore family-centred care practices in Italian neonatal intensive care units and describe areas for improvement.METHODS: A cross-sectional, multicentre, survey was conducted using the Italian language version of "Advancing family-centred new-born intensive care: a self-assessment inventory". The instrument is divided into 10 sections rating the status of family-centred care (1 = not at all, 5 = very well) and ranking the perceived priority for change/improvement (1 = low, 3 = high). A representative group of staff and parent for each unit were invited to complete the survey. Data was collected between January and June 2015. Correlations among unit characteristics and sections within the survey were explored.SETTINGS: All Italian neonatal intensive care units (n = 105) were invited.RESULTS: Forty-six (43.8%) units returned the survey. The "Leadership" section scored highest in status of family-centred care (mean = 3.45; SD 0.78) and scored highest in priority for change (mean = 2.44; SD 0.49). Section "Families as Advisors and Leaders" scored lowest both in status (mean = 1.66; SD 0.67) and in priority for change (mean = 2.09; SD 0.59). The number of discharged infants was positively correlated with many sections in priority for change (r 0.402-0.421; p < .01).CONCLUSION: This study showed a variability in the organisation of family-centred care practices in Italian neonatal intensive care units and the need to involve parents as partners in the care team. Although family-centred care is considered important by Italian neonatology healthcare professionals, much remains to be done to improve family-centred care practices in neonatal intensive care units in Italy.

AB - OBJECTIVES: To explore family-centred care practices in Italian neonatal intensive care units and describe areas for improvement.METHODS: A cross-sectional, multicentre, survey was conducted using the Italian language version of "Advancing family-centred new-born intensive care: a self-assessment inventory". The instrument is divided into 10 sections rating the status of family-centred care (1 = not at all, 5 = very well) and ranking the perceived priority for change/improvement (1 = low, 3 = high). A representative group of staff and parent for each unit were invited to complete the survey. Data was collected between January and June 2015. Correlations among unit characteristics and sections within the survey were explored.SETTINGS: All Italian neonatal intensive care units (n = 105) were invited.RESULTS: Forty-six (43.8%) units returned the survey. The "Leadership" section scored highest in status of family-centred care (mean = 3.45; SD 0.78) and scored highest in priority for change (mean = 2.44; SD 0.49). Section "Families as Advisors and Leaders" scored lowest both in status (mean = 1.66; SD 0.67) and in priority for change (mean = 2.09; SD 0.59). The number of discharged infants was positively correlated with many sections in priority for change (r 0.402-0.421; p < .01).CONCLUSION: This study showed a variability in the organisation of family-centred care practices in Italian neonatal intensive care units and the need to involve parents as partners in the care team. Although family-centred care is considered important by Italian neonatology healthcare professionals, much remains to be done to improve family-centred care practices in neonatal intensive care units in Italy.

U2 - 10.1016/j.iccn.2018.07.005

DO - 10.1016/j.iccn.2018.07.005

M3 - Article

C2 - 30075992

JO - Intensive and Critical Care Nursing

JF - Intensive and Critical Care Nursing

SN - 0964-3397

ER -