The DCDC2 intron 2 deletion impairs illusory motion perception unveiling the selective role of magnocellular-dorsal stream in reading (Dis)ability

Simone Gori, Sara Mascheretti, Enrico Giora, Luca Ronconi, Milena Ruffino, Ermanno Quadrelli, Andrea Facoetti, Cecilia Marino

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Developmental dyslexia (DD) is a heritable neurodevelopmental reading disorder that could arise from auditory, visual, and cross-modal integration deficits. A deletion in intron 2 of the DCDC2 gene (hereafter DCDC2d) increases the risk for DD and related phenotypes. In this study, first we report that illusory visual motion perception - specifically processed by the magnocellular-dorsal (M-D) stream - is impaired in children with DD compared with age-matched and reading-level controls. Second, we test for the specificity of the DCDC2d effects on the M-D stream. Children with DD and DCDC2d need significantly more contrast to process illusory motion relative to their counterpart without DCDC2d and to age-matched and reading-level controls. Irrespective of the genetic variant, children with DD perform normally in the parvocellular-ventral task. Finally, we find that DCDC2d is associated with the illusory motion perception also in adult normal readers, showing that the M-D deficit is a potential neurobiological risk factor of DD rather than a simple effect of reading disorder. Our findings demonstrate, for the first time, that a specific neurocognitive dysfunction tapping the M-D stream is linked with a well-defined genetic susceptibility.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1685-1695
Number of pages11
JournalCerebral Cortex
Volume25
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 1 2015

Keywords

  • DCDC2
  • dorsal pathway
  • illusory motion perception
  • reading (dis)abilities

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cellular and Molecular Neuroscience
  • Cognitive Neuroscience
  • Medicine(all)

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'The DCDC2 intron 2 deletion impairs illusory motion perception unveiling the selective role of magnocellular-dorsal stream in reading (Dis)ability'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this