The development of vision between nature and nurture: clinical implications from visual neuroscience: Child's Nervous System

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Abstract

Background: Vision is an adaptive function and should be considered a prerequisite for neurodevelopment because it permits the organization and the comprehension of the sensory data collected by the visual system during daily life. For this reason, the influence of visual functions on neuromotor, cognitive, and emotional development has been investigated by several studies that have highlighted how visual functions can drive the organization and maturation of human behavior. Recent studies on animals and human models have indicated that visual functions mature gradually during post-natal life, and its development is closely linked to environment and experience. Discussion: The role of vision in early brain development and some of the neuroplasticity mechanisms that have been described in the presence of cerebral damage during childhood are analyzed in this review, according to a neurorehabilitation prospective. © 2020, Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany, part of Springer Nature.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)911-917
Number of pages7
JournalChild's Nerv. Syst.
Volume36
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2020

Keywords

  • Cerebral visual impairment
  • Neurodevelopment
  • Visual behavior
  • Visual functions
  • brain damage
  • brain development
  • cognition
  • human
  • motoneuron
  • nerve cell plasticity
  • neurorehabilitation
  • neuroscience
  • priority journal
  • Review
  • vision
  • visual impairment

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