La differenza tra la pressione misurata in ambulatorio e la pressione diurna monitorata non riflette l' "effetto camice bianco".

Translated title of the contribution: The difference between clinical ambulatory measured blood pressure and daily monitored pressure does not reflect the "white coat effect"

C. Santucciu, G. Parati, L. Ulian, S. Omboni, G. Mancia

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The difference between clinic and average daytime ambulatory blood pressure is frequently used to identify patients with "white coat" hypertension (i.e. with a pronounced pressor response to the clinical evaluation) although there is no evidence that this difference is indeed due to a white coat effect. In 28 mild hypertensive outpatients, the blood pressure was continuously recorded by a noninvasive finger device before and during the doctor's visit. The peak blood pressure increase, recorded during the visit was compared with the difference between clinic and daytime average ambulatory blood pressure. Peak increases in systolic and diastolic finger blood pressure during the doctor's visit were 38.2 +/- 3.1 mmHg and 20.7 +/- 1.6 mmHg, respectively compared to pre visit values (means +/- standard error, both p <0.01). Daytime average systolic and diastolic blood pressure were 135.5 +/- 2.5 mmHg and 89.2 +/- 1.9 mmHg, both being lower than the corresponding clinic blood pressure values (146.6 +/- 3.6 mmHg and 94.9 +/- 2.2 mmHg, p <0.01). Their differences, however, were <30% of the peak finger blood pressure increase during the physician's visit. While the physician's visit was associated with tachycardia (+9.0 +/- 1.6 b/min, p <0.01) there was no difference between clinic and daytime average heart rate. The alerting reaction and the pressor response induced by the physician's visit is not reflected by the difference between clinic and daytime average blood pressure. Such a difference is not therefore a reliable measure of the white coat effect.

Translated title of the contributionThe difference between clinical ambulatory measured blood pressure and daily monitored pressure does not reflect the "white coat effect"
Original languageItalian
Pages (from-to)1067-1069
Number of pages3
JournalCardiologia
Volume42
Issue number10
Publication statusPublished - Oct 1997

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

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