The dilemma of benign multiple sclerosis: Can we predict the risk of losing the “benign status”? A 12-year follow-up study

Lorenzo Razzolini, Emilio Portaccio, Maria Laura Stromillo, Benedetta Goretti, Claudia Niccolai, Luisa Pastò, Isabella Righini, Elio Prestipino, Marco Battaglini, Antonio Giorgio, Nicola De Stefano, Maria Pia Amato

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Definition of benign multiple sclerosis (BMS) remains controversial. Moreover, a sizeable proportion of classically defined BMS patients may be no longer benign (NLB) when re-assessed in the long-term. In a previous work, we found that after a five-year follow-up, a clinical score was able to identify patients at risk of losing their benign status. Objectives: In this 12-year reappraisal of the same cohort, we aimed at assessing the predictive value of the same score in the long-term. Methods: After a mean follow-up of 12.6 + 0.4 years, patients still having an EDSS score <3.0 were classified as “still benign” (SB), whereas patients having an EDSS score ≥3.5 were defined as NLB. The predictive value of the mentioned score was re-assessed using survival analysis. Results: By the end of the follow-up, 20 (32.8%) were classified as NLB. Patients were grouped on the basis of the above mentioned score. Patients with score 2–3 were at higher risk of NLB status at the follow-up (HR = 3.5; 95%CI 1.5–8.6; p = 0.005, accuracy = 70.5%). Conclusions: In patients with established BMS, prognostic prediction of longer-term disease course remains of critical value. In this study, a clinical score was able to predict disease evolution in the long term.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)71-73
Number of pages3
JournalMultiple Sclerosis and Related Disorders
Volume26
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Nov 1 2018

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Multiple Sclerosis
Survival Analysis

Keywords

  • Benign
  • Clinical score
  • Cognitive impairment
  • Longitudinal assessment
  • Multiple sclerosis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neurology
  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

The dilemma of benign multiple sclerosis : Can we predict the risk of losing the “benign status”? A 12-year follow-up study. / Razzolini, Lorenzo; Portaccio, Emilio; Stromillo, Maria Laura; Goretti, Benedetta; Niccolai, Claudia; Pastò, Luisa; Righini, Isabella; Prestipino, Elio; Battaglini, Marco; Giorgio, Antonio; De Stefano, Nicola; Amato, Maria Pia.

In: Multiple Sclerosis and Related Disorders, Vol. 26, 01.11.2018, p. 71-73.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Razzolini, L, Portaccio, E, Stromillo, ML, Goretti, B, Niccolai, C, Pastò, L, Righini, I, Prestipino, E, Battaglini, M, Giorgio, A, De Stefano, N & Amato, MP 2018, 'The dilemma of benign multiple sclerosis: Can we predict the risk of losing the “benign status”? A 12-year follow-up study', Multiple Sclerosis and Related Disorders, vol. 26, pp. 71-73. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.msard.2018.08.011
Razzolini, Lorenzo ; Portaccio, Emilio ; Stromillo, Maria Laura ; Goretti, Benedetta ; Niccolai, Claudia ; Pastò, Luisa ; Righini, Isabella ; Prestipino, Elio ; Battaglini, Marco ; Giorgio, Antonio ; De Stefano, Nicola ; Amato, Maria Pia. / The dilemma of benign multiple sclerosis : Can we predict the risk of losing the “benign status”? A 12-year follow-up study. In: Multiple Sclerosis and Related Disorders. 2018 ; Vol. 26. pp. 71-73.
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abstract = "Background: Definition of benign multiple sclerosis (BMS) remains controversial. Moreover, a sizeable proportion of classically defined BMS patients may be no longer benign (NLB) when re-assessed in the long-term. In a previous work, we found that after a five-year follow-up, a clinical score was able to identify patients at risk of losing their benign status. Objectives: In this 12-year reappraisal of the same cohort, we aimed at assessing the predictive value of the same score in the long-term. Methods: After a mean follow-up of 12.6 + 0.4 years, patients still having an EDSS score <3.0 were classified as “still benign” (SB), whereas patients having an EDSS score ≥3.5 were defined as NLB. The predictive value of the mentioned score was re-assessed using survival analysis. Results: By the end of the follow-up, 20 (32.8{\%}) were classified as NLB. Patients were grouped on the basis of the above mentioned score. Patients with score 2–3 were at higher risk of NLB status at the follow-up (HR = 3.5; 95{\%}CI 1.5–8.6; p = 0.005, accuracy = 70.5{\%}). Conclusions: In patients with established BMS, prognostic prediction of longer-term disease course remains of critical value. In this study, a clinical score was able to predict disease evolution in the long term.",
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T2 - Can we predict the risk of losing the “benign status”? A 12-year follow-up study

AU - Razzolini, Lorenzo

AU - Portaccio, Emilio

AU - Stromillo, Maria Laura

AU - Goretti, Benedetta

AU - Niccolai, Claudia

AU - Pastò, Luisa

AU - Righini, Isabella

AU - Prestipino, Elio

AU - Battaglini, Marco

AU - Giorgio, Antonio

AU - De Stefano, Nicola

AU - Amato, Maria Pia

PY - 2018/11/1

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N2 - Background: Definition of benign multiple sclerosis (BMS) remains controversial. Moreover, a sizeable proportion of classically defined BMS patients may be no longer benign (NLB) when re-assessed in the long-term. In a previous work, we found that after a five-year follow-up, a clinical score was able to identify patients at risk of losing their benign status. Objectives: In this 12-year reappraisal of the same cohort, we aimed at assessing the predictive value of the same score in the long-term. Methods: After a mean follow-up of 12.6 + 0.4 years, patients still having an EDSS score <3.0 were classified as “still benign” (SB), whereas patients having an EDSS score ≥3.5 were defined as NLB. The predictive value of the mentioned score was re-assessed using survival analysis. Results: By the end of the follow-up, 20 (32.8%) were classified as NLB. Patients were grouped on the basis of the above mentioned score. Patients with score 2–3 were at higher risk of NLB status at the follow-up (HR = 3.5; 95%CI 1.5–8.6; p = 0.005, accuracy = 70.5%). Conclusions: In patients with established BMS, prognostic prediction of longer-term disease course remains of critical value. In this study, a clinical score was able to predict disease evolution in the long term.

AB - Background: Definition of benign multiple sclerosis (BMS) remains controversial. Moreover, a sizeable proportion of classically defined BMS patients may be no longer benign (NLB) when re-assessed in the long-term. In a previous work, we found that after a five-year follow-up, a clinical score was able to identify patients at risk of losing their benign status. Objectives: In this 12-year reappraisal of the same cohort, we aimed at assessing the predictive value of the same score in the long-term. Methods: After a mean follow-up of 12.6 + 0.4 years, patients still having an EDSS score <3.0 were classified as “still benign” (SB), whereas patients having an EDSS score ≥3.5 were defined as NLB. The predictive value of the mentioned score was re-assessed using survival analysis. Results: By the end of the follow-up, 20 (32.8%) were classified as NLB. Patients were grouped on the basis of the above mentioned score. Patients with score 2–3 were at higher risk of NLB status at the follow-up (HR = 3.5; 95%CI 1.5–8.6; p = 0.005, accuracy = 70.5%). Conclusions: In patients with established BMS, prognostic prediction of longer-term disease course remains of critical value. In this study, a clinical score was able to predict disease evolution in the long term.

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