The dying stem cell hypothesis: Immune modulation as a novel mechanism for progenitor cell therapy in cardiac muscle

Thomas Thum, Johann Bauersachs, Philip A. Poole-Wilson, Hans Dieter Volk, Stefan D. Anker

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Stem cell transplantation after myocardial infarction has been claimed to restore cardiac function, but the underlying mechanism remains unclear. A minority of transplanted cells become adherent in heart tissue and contribute to neovascularization, whereas many donor cells die from apoptosis. We propose that apoptosis of transplanted cells modulates local tissue reactions. Apoptotic cells impact on immune reactivity by down-regulating innate and adaptive immunity, deactivating macrophages and dendritic cells, and stimulating regulatory T cells. This leads to reduced scar formation, repressed myocardial apoptosis, and improved cardiac outcome.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1799-1802
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of the American College of Cardiology
Volume46
Issue number10
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Nov 15 2005

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Nursing(all)

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