The effect of a change in sleep-wakefulness timing, bright light and physical exercise interventions on 24-hour patterns of performance, mood and body temperature.

I. Iskra-Golec, M. Fafrowicz, T. Marek, G. Costa, S. Folkard, J. Foret, M. Kundi, L. Smith

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Experiments consisting of baseline, bright light and physical exercise studies were carried out to compare the effect of a 9-hour delay in sleep-wakefulness timing, and the effects of bright light and physical exercise interventions on 24-hour patterns of performance, mood and body temperature were examined. Each study comprised a 24-hour constant routine at the beginning followed by 3 night shifts and 24-hour constant routine at the end. Performance on tasks differing in cognitive load, mood and body temperature was measured during each constant routine and the interventions were applied during the night shifts. The 24-hour pattern of alertness and performance on the tasks with low cognitive load in post-treatment conditions followed the change in sleep-wakefulness timing while more cognitively loaded tasks tended to show a reverse trend when compared to pre-treatment conditions. There was a phase delay around 4 hours in circadian rhythms of body temperature in post-treatment conditions.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)261-266
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Human Ergology
Volume30
Issue number1-2
Publication statusPublished - 2001

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Wakefulness
Body Temperature
Sleep
Task Performance and Analysis
Exercise
Light
Circadian Rhythm
Therapeutics

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The effect of a change in sleep-wakefulness timing, bright light and physical exercise interventions on 24-hour patterns of performance, mood and body temperature. / Iskra-Golec, I.; Fafrowicz, M.; Marek, T.; Costa, G.; Folkard, S.; Foret, J.; Kundi, M.; Smith, L.

In: Journal of Human Ergology, Vol. 30, No. 1-2, 2001, p. 261-266.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Iskra-Golec, I. ; Fafrowicz, M. ; Marek, T. ; Costa, G. ; Folkard, S. ; Foret, J. ; Kundi, M. ; Smith, L. / The effect of a change in sleep-wakefulness timing, bright light and physical exercise interventions on 24-hour patterns of performance, mood and body temperature. In: Journal of Human Ergology. 2001 ; Vol. 30, No. 1-2. pp. 261-266.
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