The effect of melatonin, magnesium, and zinc on primary insomnia in long-term care facility residents in italy: A double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial

Mariangela Rondanelli, Annalisa Opizzi, Francesca Monteferrario, Neldo Antoniello, Raffaele Manni, Catherine Klersy

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

43 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

OBJECTIVES: To determine whether nightly administration of melatonin, magnesium, and zinc improves primary insomnia in long-term care facility residents. DESIGN: Double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial. SETTING: One long-term care facility in Pavia, Italy. PARTICIPANTS: Forty-three participants with primary insomnia (22 in the supplemented group, 21 in the placebo group) aged 78.3±3.9. INTERVENTION: Participants took a food supplement (5 mg melatonin, 225 mg magnesium, and 11.25 mg zinc, mixed with 100 g of pear pulp) or placebo (100 g pear pulp) every day for 8 weeks, 1 hour before bedtime. MEASUREMENTS: The primary goal was to evaluate sleep quality using the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index. The Epworth Sleepiness Scale, the Leeds Sleep Evaluation Questionnaire (LSEQ), the Short Insomnia Questionnaire (SDQ), and a validated quality-of-life instrument (Medical Outcomes Study 36-item Short Form Survey (SF-36)) were administered as secondary end points. Total sleep time was evaluated using a wearable armband-shaped sensor. All measures were performed at baseline and after 60 days. RESULTS: The food supplement resulted in considerably better overall PSQI scores than placebo (difference between groups in change from baseline PSQI score=6.8; 95% confidence interval=5.4-8.3, P

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)82-90
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of the American Geriatrics Society
Volume59
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 2011

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Controlled Clinical Trials
Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders
Long-Term Care
Melatonin
Magnesium
Italy
Zinc
Sleep
Placebos
Pyrus
Dietary Supplements
Quality of Life
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Confidence Intervals
Surveys and Questionnaires

Keywords

  • dietary supplement
  • elderly
  • insomnia
  • magnesium
  • melatonin
  • zinc

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Geriatrics and Gerontology

Cite this

The effect of melatonin, magnesium, and zinc on primary insomnia in long-term care facility residents in italy : A double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial. / Rondanelli, Mariangela; Opizzi, Annalisa; Monteferrario, Francesca; Antoniello, Neldo; Manni, Raffaele; Klersy, Catherine.

In: Journal of the American Geriatrics Society, Vol. 59, No. 1, 01.2011, p. 82-90.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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