The effect of surface material and roughness on bone screw stability

Antonio Moroni, Cesare Faldini, Valerio Chilò, Michele Rocca, Susanna Stea, Sandro Giannini

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

16 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To evaluate the effects of osteointegration ability and surface texture on bone screw interface stability in three different groups of titanium screws. Design: Sixty titanium tapered screws were used: twenty screws were polished, uncoated (Group A); twenty screws were rough, coated with titanium (Group B); and twenty screws were rough, coated with fluor-hydroxyapatite (Group C). Thirty screws, ten per group, were implanted in the femurs and tibiae of two sheep, which were euthanized one month after surgery. The remaining thirty screws, ten per group, were implanted in the femurs and tibiae of another two sheep, which were euthanized three months after surgery. Results: At one month, extraction torque of Group C was higher than that of Group A (p = 0.042). At three months, extraction torque of Group C was higher than that of Group A (p <0.0001) and Group B (p <0.0001). At three months, extraction torque of Group C was higher compared with the corresponding insertion torque (p <0.0001) and compared with the corresponding extraction torque at one month (p <0.0001). At one and three months, a high percentage of bone-screw contact was observed histologically in Groups B and C. A continuous gap with fibrous tissue encapsulation was observed in Group A. Conclusions: This study shows that the osteointegration ability provided by the type of coating is a very important parameter for optimizing the bone-screw stability. Surface texture is also important. By using screws with optimal osteointegration ability, very positive clinical consequences can be expected.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)477-482
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Orthopaedic Trauma
Volume13
Issue number7
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sep 1999

Fingerprint

Bone Screws
Torque
Titanium
Tibia
Femur
Sheep

Keywords

  • Bone
  • Fixation
  • Fluor-hydroxyapatite
  • Screw
  • Titanium

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine
  • Surgery
  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation

Cite this

The effect of surface material and roughness on bone screw stability. / Moroni, Antonio; Faldini, Cesare; Chilò, Valerio; Rocca, Michele; Stea, Susanna; Giannini, Sandro.

In: Journal of Orthopaedic Trauma, Vol. 13, No. 7, 09.1999, p. 477-482.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Moroni, Antonio ; Faldini, Cesare ; Chilò, Valerio ; Rocca, Michele ; Stea, Susanna ; Giannini, Sandro. / The effect of surface material and roughness on bone screw stability. In: Journal of Orthopaedic Trauma. 1999 ; Vol. 13, No. 7. pp. 477-482.
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