The effect of tms on visual motion sensitivity: An increase in neural noise or a decrease in signal strength?

Manuela Ruzzoli, Arman Abrahamyan, Colin W G Clifford, Carlo A. Marzi, Carlo Miniussi, Justin A. Harris

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The underlying mechanisms of action of transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) are still a matter of debate. TMS may impair a subject's performance by increasing neural noise, suppressing the neural signal, or both. Here, we delivered a single pulse of TMS (spTMS) to V5/MT during a motion direction discrimination task while concurrently manipulating the level of noise in the motion stimulus. Our results indicate that spTMS essentially acts by suppressing the strength of the relevant visual signal. We suggest that TMS may induce a pattern of neural activity that complements the ongoing activation elicited by the sensory signal in a manner that partially impoverishes that signal

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)138-143
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Neurophysiology
Volume106
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 2011

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Keywords

  • V5/MT; single pulse of transcranial magnetic stimulation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology
  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

Ruzzoli, M., Abrahamyan, A., Clifford, C. W. G., Marzi, C. A., Miniussi, C., & Harris, J. A. (2011). The effect of tms on visual motion sensitivity: An increase in neural noise or a decrease in signal strength? Journal of Neurophysiology, 106(1), 138-143. https://doi.org/10.1152/jn.00746.2010