The emerging role of the human bone marrow as a privileged developmental niche for the transmission stages of the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

Abstract

The spread of malaria relies on the ability of the Plasmodium parasites to be transmitted from infected individuals to the Anopheles mosquito vectors. Recent work on the most lethal of the malaria parasites, Plasmodium falciparum, identified the infected human bone marrow as a preferential site for the localization and maturation of the parasite transmission stages, the gametocytes. These findings unveil a complex host parasite interplay and an unsuspected role of the bone marrow microenvironment in the successful transmission of the malaria parasite and have major implications in developing and targeting future interventions to block the transmission of P. falciparum.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)96-99
Number of pages4
JournalAnnali dell'Istituto Superiore di Sanita
Volume53
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 1 2017

Keywords

  • Bone marrow
  • Gametocytes
  • Malaria
  • Plasmodium transmission
  • Stromal microenvironment

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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