The European Vulvovaginal Epidemiological Survey (EVES) in Italy. Impact of vulvovaginal atrophy on the quality of life and sexual function in breast cancer survivors

EVES Study investigators

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The European Vulvovaginal Epidemiology Survey (EVES) sub-analysis assesses the impact of history of breast cancer (HBC) on vulvovaginal atrophy (VVA), sexual function and quality of life in a sample of postmenopausal women. Women aged 45-75 years with at least one symptom of VVA attending Italian menopause centers were included; subgroup data were described according to the absence (N = 967) or presence (N = 78) of HBC. VVA confirmed by gynecological examination and Vaginal Health Index < 15 was more prevalent in women with HBC (93.6% vs. 86.0% and 78.2% vs. 65.9%, respectively). Self-reported vaginal discharge, itching and urinary frequency were more prevalent in women without HBC compared to different HBC subgroups. Day-to-Day Impact of Vaginal Aging (DIVA) and sexual function scores were similar between women with or without HBC, but women who have completed breast cancer (BC) therapy showed lower sexual distress. Women with HBC had a higher vaginal prevalence and severity of signs of VVA, while self-reported VVA symptoms were generally less disruptive in women with HBC. These exploratory findings warrant confirmation in larger studies.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)38-44
Number of pages7
JournalEuropean Journal of Gynaecological Oncology
Volume42
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 15 2021

Keywords

  • Breast cancer
  • Genitourinary syndrome of menopause
  • Gynecological examination
  • Menopause
  • Quality of life
  • Sexual dysfunction
  • Vulvovaginal atrophy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Obstetrics and Gynaecology

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'The European Vulvovaginal Epidemiological Survey (EVES) in Italy. Impact of vulvovaginal atrophy on the quality of life and sexual function in breast cancer survivors'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this