The existence of primary age-related tauopathy suggests that not all the cases with early braak stages of neurofibrillary pathology are Alzheimer's disease

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Abstract

The distinction between Alzheimer's disease (AD) and Primary Age-Related Tauopathy (PART) is a hotly debated issue. As most lines of evidence support the tenet that tau pathology occurs downstream of amyloid-β deposition, it seems reasonable to consider PART as a separate disease process not necessarily related to Aβ and hence AD. Following this view, the early stages of neurofibrillary pathology may not always be the forerunner of diffuse neurofibrillary changes and AD. The ongoing debate further enhances the need for greater caution against any future predictions using tau cerebrospinal fluid and imaging biomarkers.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)919-921
Number of pages3
JournalJournal of Alzheimer's Disease
Volume48
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Oct 27 2015

Keywords

  • Alzheimer's disease
  • Braak staging
  • neuropathology
  • Primary Age-Related Tauopathy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Geriatrics and Gerontology
  • Clinical Psychology

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