The health impact of child labor in developing countries: Evidence from cross-country data

Paola Roggero, Viviana Mangiaterra, Flavia Bustreo, Furio Rosati

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

29 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives. Research on child labor and its effect on health has been limited. We sought to determine the impact of child labor on children's health by correlating existing health indicators with the prevalence of child labor in selected developing countries. Methods. We analyzed the relationship between child labor (defined as the percentage of children aged 10 to 14 years who were workers) and selected health indicators in 83 countries using multiple regression to determine the nature and strength of the relation. The regression included control variables such as the percentage of the population below the poverty line and the adult mortality rate. Results. Child labor was significantly and positively related to adolescent mortality, to a population's nutrition level, and to the presence of infectious disease. Conclusions. Longitudinal studies are required to understand the short- and long-term health effects of child labor on the individual child.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)271-275
Number of pages5
JournalAmerican Journal of Public Health
Volume97
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 2007

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Developing Countries
Health
Mortality
Poverty
Population
Communicable Diseases
Longitudinal Studies
Research

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

The health impact of child labor in developing countries : Evidence from cross-country data. / Roggero, Paola; Mangiaterra, Viviana; Bustreo, Flavia; Rosati, Furio.

In: American Journal of Public Health, Vol. 97, No. 2, 02.2007, p. 271-275.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Roggero, Paola ; Mangiaterra, Viviana ; Bustreo, Flavia ; Rosati, Furio. / The health impact of child labor in developing countries : Evidence from cross-country data. In: American Journal of Public Health. 2007 ; Vol. 97, No. 2. pp. 271-275.
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