The human T-cell receptor

Oreste Acuto, Marina Fabbi, Armand Bensussan, Claudio Milanese, Thomas J. Campen, Hans Dieter Royer, Ellis L. Reinherz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Recent studies using cloned antigen-specific T lymphocytes and monoclonal antibodies directed at their various surface glycoprotein components have led to the identification of the human T-cell antigen receptor as a surface complex comprised of a clonotypic 90-kD Ti heterodimer and the invariant 20- and 25-kD T3 molecules. Approximately 30,000-40,000 Ti and T3 molecules exist on the surface of human T lymphocytes. These glycoproteins are acquired and expressed during late thymic ontogeny, thus providing the structural basis for immunologic competence. The α and β subunits of Ti bear no precursor-product relationship to one another and are encoded by separate genes. Moreover, the presence of unique peptides following proteolysis of different Ti molecules isolated by non-cross-reactive anticlonotypic monoclonal antibodies supports the notion that variable regions exist within both the α and the β subunits. N-Terminal amino acid sequencing and molecular cloning of the Ti β subunit further show that it bears an homology to the first V-region framework of immunoglobulin light chains and represents the product of a gene that rearranges specifically in T lymphocytes. Triggering of the T3-Ti receptor complex gives rise to specific antigen-induced proliferation through an autocrine pathway involving endogenous IL-2 production, release, and subsequent binding to IL-2 receptors. The implications of these findings for understanding human T-cell growth and its regulation in disease states are discussed.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)141-157
Number of pages17
JournalJournal of Clinical Immunology
Volume5
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - May 1985

Fingerprint

T-Cell Antigen Receptor
T-Lymphocytes
Monoclonal Antibodies
Immunoglobulin Light Chains
Immunocompetence
Antigens
Thyroid Hormone Receptors
Forensic Anthropology
Interleukin-2 Receptors
Membrane Glycoproteins
Protein Sequence Analysis
Molecular Cloning
Proteolysis
Genes
Interleukin-2
Glycoproteins
Peptides
Growth

Keywords

  • gene
  • T cell antigen receptor
  • T cell subset

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Immunology

Cite this

Acuto, O., Fabbi, M., Bensussan, A., Milanese, C., Campen, T. J., Royer, H. D., & Reinherz, E. L. (1985). The human T-cell receptor. Journal of Clinical Immunology, 5(3), 141-157. https://doi.org/10.1007/BF00915505

The human T-cell receptor. / Acuto, Oreste; Fabbi, Marina; Bensussan, Armand; Milanese, Claudio; Campen, Thomas J.; Royer, Hans Dieter; Reinherz, Ellis L.

In: Journal of Clinical Immunology, Vol. 5, No. 3, 05.1985, p. 141-157.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Acuto, O, Fabbi, M, Bensussan, A, Milanese, C, Campen, TJ, Royer, HD & Reinherz, EL 1985, 'The human T-cell receptor', Journal of Clinical Immunology, vol. 5, no. 3, pp. 141-157. https://doi.org/10.1007/BF00915505
Acuto O, Fabbi M, Bensussan A, Milanese C, Campen TJ, Royer HD et al. The human T-cell receptor. Journal of Clinical Immunology. 1985 May;5(3):141-157. https://doi.org/10.1007/BF00915505
Acuto, Oreste ; Fabbi, Marina ; Bensussan, Armand ; Milanese, Claudio ; Campen, Thomas J. ; Royer, Hans Dieter ; Reinherz, Ellis L. / The human T-cell receptor. In: Journal of Clinical Immunology. 1985 ; Vol. 5, No. 3. pp. 141-157.
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