The Impact of Heller Myotomy on Integrated Relaxation Pressure in Esophageal Achalasia

Renato Salvador, Edoardo Savarino, Elisa Pesenti, Lorenzo Spadotto, Giovanni Capovilla, Francesco Cavallin, Francesca Galeazzi, Loredana Nicoletti, Stefano Merigliano, Mario Costantini

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: A new high-resolution manometry (HRM) parameter, the integrated relaxation pressure (IRP), has been proposed for the assessment of esophageal-gastric junction (EGJ) relaxation. Our aim was to assess the effect of Heller myotomy on IRP in achalasia patients. Methods: We prospectively collected data on achalasia patients who underwent HRM between 2009–2014. Barium swallow was used to assess esophageal diameter and shape. Manometric diagnoses were performed by using the Chicago Classification v3. All patients with a confirmed diagnosis of achalasia were treated surgically with Heller Myotomy Results: One hundred thirty-nine consecutive achalasia patients (M:F = 72:67) represented the study population. All the patients had 100 % simultaneous waves but 11 had an IRP <15 mmHg. At median follow-up of 28 months, the median of IRP was significantly lower after surgery (27.4 [IQR 20.4–35] vs 7.1 [IQR 4.4–9.8]; p <0.001), and so were the lower esophageal sphincter (LES) resting pressure (27 [IQR 18–33] vs 6 [IQR 3–11]; p <0.001). At univariate analysis, IRP correlated with the gender, LES resting residual pressure, and dysphagia score. Conclusions: This is the first study to have examined the role of IRP in achalasia, and how it changes after surgical treatment. An increased preoperative IRP correlated directly with a more severe dysphagia. The IRP was restored to normal by Heller myotomy.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)125-131
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Gastrointestinal Surgery
Volume20
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 1 2016

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Esophageal Achalasia
Pressure
Lower Esophageal Sphincter
Manometry
Deglutition Disorders
Barium
Deglutition
Stomach

Keywords

  • Achalasia
  • Heller myotomy
  • High-resolution manometry
  • Integrated relaxation pressure

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Gastroenterology

Cite this

The Impact of Heller Myotomy on Integrated Relaxation Pressure in Esophageal Achalasia. / Salvador, Renato; Savarino, Edoardo; Pesenti, Elisa; Spadotto, Lorenzo; Capovilla, Giovanni; Cavallin, Francesco; Galeazzi, Francesca; Nicoletti, Loredana; Merigliano, Stefano; Costantini, Mario.

In: Journal of Gastrointestinal Surgery, Vol. 20, No. 1, 01.01.2016, p. 125-131.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Salvador, R, Savarino, E, Pesenti, E, Spadotto, L, Capovilla, G, Cavallin, F, Galeazzi, F, Nicoletti, L, Merigliano, S & Costantini, M 2016, 'The Impact of Heller Myotomy on Integrated Relaxation Pressure in Esophageal Achalasia', Journal of Gastrointestinal Surgery, vol. 20, no. 1, pp. 125-131. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11605-015-3006-x
Salvador, Renato ; Savarino, Edoardo ; Pesenti, Elisa ; Spadotto, Lorenzo ; Capovilla, Giovanni ; Cavallin, Francesco ; Galeazzi, Francesca ; Nicoletti, Loredana ; Merigliano, Stefano ; Costantini, Mario. / The Impact of Heller Myotomy on Integrated Relaxation Pressure in Esophageal Achalasia. In: Journal of Gastrointestinal Surgery. 2016 ; Vol. 20, No. 1. pp. 125-131.
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AU - Capovilla, Giovanni

AU - Cavallin, Francesco

AU - Galeazzi, Francesca

AU - Nicoletti, Loredana

AU - Merigliano, Stefano

AU - Costantini, Mario

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N2 - Background: A new high-resolution manometry (HRM) parameter, the integrated relaxation pressure (IRP), has been proposed for the assessment of esophageal-gastric junction (EGJ) relaxation. Our aim was to assess the effect of Heller myotomy on IRP in achalasia patients. Methods: We prospectively collected data on achalasia patients who underwent HRM between 2009–2014. Barium swallow was used to assess esophageal diameter and shape. Manometric diagnoses were performed by using the Chicago Classification v3. All patients with a confirmed diagnosis of achalasia were treated surgically with Heller Myotomy Results: One hundred thirty-nine consecutive achalasia patients (M:F = 72:67) represented the study population. All the patients had 100 % simultaneous waves but 11 had an IRP <15 mmHg. At median follow-up of 28 months, the median of IRP was significantly lower after surgery (27.4 [IQR 20.4–35] vs 7.1 [IQR 4.4–9.8]; p <0.001), and so were the lower esophageal sphincter (LES) resting pressure (27 [IQR 18–33] vs 6 [IQR 3–11]; p <0.001). At univariate analysis, IRP correlated with the gender, LES resting residual pressure, and dysphagia score. Conclusions: This is the first study to have examined the role of IRP in achalasia, and how it changes after surgical treatment. An increased preoperative IRP correlated directly with a more severe dysphagia. The IRP was restored to normal by Heller myotomy.

AB - Background: A new high-resolution manometry (HRM) parameter, the integrated relaxation pressure (IRP), has been proposed for the assessment of esophageal-gastric junction (EGJ) relaxation. Our aim was to assess the effect of Heller myotomy on IRP in achalasia patients. Methods: We prospectively collected data on achalasia patients who underwent HRM between 2009–2014. Barium swallow was used to assess esophageal diameter and shape. Manometric diagnoses were performed by using the Chicago Classification v3. All patients with a confirmed diagnosis of achalasia were treated surgically with Heller Myotomy Results: One hundred thirty-nine consecutive achalasia patients (M:F = 72:67) represented the study population. All the patients had 100 % simultaneous waves but 11 had an IRP <15 mmHg. At median follow-up of 28 months, the median of IRP was significantly lower after surgery (27.4 [IQR 20.4–35] vs 7.1 [IQR 4.4–9.8]; p <0.001), and so were the lower esophageal sphincter (LES) resting pressure (27 [IQR 18–33] vs 6 [IQR 3–11]; p <0.001). At univariate analysis, IRP correlated with the gender, LES resting residual pressure, and dysphagia score. Conclusions: This is the first study to have examined the role of IRP in achalasia, and how it changes after surgical treatment. An increased preoperative IRP correlated directly with a more severe dysphagia. The IRP was restored to normal by Heller myotomy.

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