The importance of pulse pressure on cardiovascular risk and total mortality in the general population: Is sex relevant?

Marijana Tadic, Fosca Quarti-Trevano, Michele Bombelli, Rita Facchetti, Cesare Cuspidi, Giuseppe Mancia, Guido Grassi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The aim of the present study is to investigate the predictive value of pulse pressure (PP) on cardiovascular events in the general population and in both sexes, separately. The study involved 2045 participants from the PAMELA study who underwent 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure (BP) monitoring. The participants were followed from the initial medical visit for a time interval of 137 ± 23 months. It was found that office, home, and 24-hour blood pressures were significantly higher in the individuals who experienced cardiovascular (CV) events. Office, 24-hour, and daytime PP were independent predictors of CV events after adjustment for main demographic and clinical parameters in the whole study population. Nighttime PP was an additional independent predictor in men. In conclusion, PP represents an important predictor of cardiovascular events in the general population, particularly among men. Daytime and 24-hour PP have greater predictive importance than nighttime PP in the general population.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1001-1007
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Clinical Hypertension
Volume20
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 1 2018

Keywords

  • 24-hour blood pressure monitoring
  • cardiovascular morbidity
  • pulse pressure

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Internal Medicine
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

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