The interplay between indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase 1 (IDO1) and cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 in chronic inflammation and cancer

A. Cesario, B. Rocca, S. Rutella

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

43 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The enzyme indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase 1 (IDO1) degrades the essential amino acid tryptophan into kynurenine and other downstream metabolites that suppress effector T-cell function and favor the differentiation of regulatory T cells. IDO1 is traditionally viewed as a general suppressor of T-cell activation and mediator of immune escape in cancer. Recently, evidence has emerged to support a greater functional complexity of IDO1 as modifier of pathogenic inflammation. For instance, IDO1 activity may sustain autoantibody production by B cells, and elicit the development of cancer in the context of chronic inflammation. Cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 metabolizes the first enzymatic step in the conversion of arachidonic acid into prostanoids. In particular, prostaglandin (PG)E2 generated at sites of inflammation and/or immune response is mainly COX-2-derived and has pro-inflammatory and immune regulatory activities. Pharmacological blockade of COX-2 in animal models of cancer translates into down-regulation of IDO1 expression at tumor sites and decreased levels of kynurenine in the circulation, underpinning the view that IDO1 might be downstream of COX-2. This article reviews preclinical studies focusing on IDO1 and COX-2 as inter-related molecular targets for therapeutic intervention in chronic inflammation and cancer. COX-2 inhibition might, in principle, be pursued in cancer-associated inflammation characterized by IDO1 hyper-activity, with the foreseeable aim at altering the immune response within the tumor microenvironment.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2263-2271
Number of pages9
JournalCurrent Medicinal Chemistry
Volume18
Issue number15
Publication statusPublished - May 2011

Fingerprint

Indoleamine-Pyrrole 2,3,-Dioxygenase
Cyclooxygenase 2
Inflammation
T-cells
Neoplasms
Kynurenine
Tumors
T-Lymphocytes
Essential Amino Acids
Tumor Microenvironment
Regulatory T-Lymphocytes
Metabolites
Dinoprostone
Arachidonic Acid
Tryptophan
Autoantibodies
Prostaglandins
Animals
B-Lymphocytes
Down-Regulation

Keywords

  • Cancer
  • Cyclooxygenase-2
  • Hematopoietic growth factors
  • Immune tolerance
  • Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase
  • Prostaglandins
  • Regulatory T cell

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Molecular Medicine
  • Pharmacology

Cite this

The interplay between indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase 1 (IDO1) and cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 in chronic inflammation and cancer. / Cesario, A.; Rocca, B.; Rutella, S.

In: Current Medicinal Chemistry, Vol. 18, No. 15, 05.2011, p. 2263-2271.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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