The Interplay of Reactive Oxygen Species, Hypoxia, Inflammation, and Sirtuins in Cancer Initiation and Progression

Marco Tafani, Luigi Sansone, Federica Limana, Tania Arcangeli, Elena De Santis, Milena Polese, Massimo Fini, Matteo A. Russo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

90 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The presence of ROS is a constant feature in living cells metabolizing O2. ROS concentration and compartmentation determine their physiological or pathological effects. ROS overproduction is a feature of cancer cells and plays several roles during the natural history of malignant tumor. ROS continuously contribute to each step of cancerogenesis, from the initiation to the malignant progression, acting directly or indirectly. In this review, we will (a) underline the role of ROS in the pathway leading a normal cell to tumor transformation and progression, (b) define the multiple roles of ROS during the natural history of a tumor, (c) conciliate many conflicting data about harmful or beneficial effects of ROS, (d) rethink the importance of oncogene and tumor suppressor gene mutations in relation to the malignant progression, and (e) collocate all the cancer hallmarks in a mechanistic sequence which could represent a "physiological" response to the initial growth of a transformed stem/pluripotent cell, defining also the role of ROS in each hallmark. We will provide a simplified sketch about the relationships between ROS and cancer. The attention will be focused on the contribution of ROS to the signaling of HIF, NFκB, and Sirtuins as a leitmotif of cancer initiation and progression.

Original languageEnglish
Article number3907147
JournalOxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity
Volume2016
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2016

Fingerprint

Sirtuins
Tumors
Reactive Oxygen Species
Inflammation
Neoplasms
Cells
Stem cells
Genetic Suppression
Genes
Pluripotent Stem Cells
Hypoxia
Tumor Suppressor Genes
Oncogenes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cell Biology
  • Ageing
  • Biochemistry

Cite this

The Interplay of Reactive Oxygen Species, Hypoxia, Inflammation, and Sirtuins in Cancer Initiation and Progression. / Tafani, Marco; Sansone, Luigi; Limana, Federica; Arcangeli, Tania; De Santis, Elena; Polese, Milena; Fini, Massimo; Russo, Matteo A.

In: Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity, Vol. 2016, 3907147, 2016.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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