The management of newborns with esophageal atresia and right aortic arch: A systematic review or still unsolved problem

Filippo Parolini, Andrea Armellini, Giovanni Boroni, Pietro Bagolan, Daniele Alberti

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Abstract

Aim of the study The management of newborns with esophageal atresia (EA) and right aortic arch (RAA) is still an unsolved problem. This study provides a systematic review of epidemiology, diagnosis, management and short-term results of children with EA and RAA. Materials and methods The PubMed database was searched for original studies on children with EA and RAA. In each study, data were extracted for the following outcomes: number of patients, associated anomalies, type of surgical repair, morbidity and mortality rate. Results Eight studies were selected, including 54 patients with EA and RAA. RAA was encountered in 3.6% of infants. Preoperative detection of RAA was reported in 7 of them. In these patients, primary anastomosis was achieved through the right approach in 3 (thoracotomy in 2 and thoracoscopy in 1) while the left approach was the primary choice in 4 (thoracotomy in 2 and thoracoscopy in 2). No significant differences were found between the right and left approaches with regard to leaks (P = 0.89), strictures (P = 1) or mortality (P = 1). In 47/54 patients (87%) RAA was noted during right thoracotomy, and primary anastomosis was achieved through the same approach in 29 (61.7%); conversion to other approaches (left thoracotomy or esophageal substitution) was performed in 15 children (38.3%). No significant differences were found between primary left thoracotomy (LT) and LT after RT with regard to leaks (P = 0.89), strictures (P = 1) or mortality (P = 1). Conclusions Skills and preferences of the surgeon still guide the choice of surgical approach even when preoperatively faced with RAA. A multicenter, prospective randomized study is strongly required.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)304-309
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Pediatric Surgery
Volume51
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 1 2016

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Keywords

  • Children
  • Intussusception
  • Radiation
  • Reduction
  • Saline enema
  • Sonography
  • Ultrasound

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

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