The mark coventry award articular: Contact estimation in TKA using in vivo kinematics and finite element analysis

Fabio Catani, Bernardo Innocenti, Claudio Belvedere, Luc Labey, Andrea Ensini, Alberto Leardini

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

In vivo fluoroscopy is a well-known technique to analyze joint kinematics of the replaced knee. With this method, however, the contact areas between femoral and tibial components, fundamental for monitoring wear and validating design concepts, are hard to identify. We developed and tested a novel technique to assess condylar and post-cam contacts in TKA. The technique uses in vivo motion data of the replaced knee from standard fluoroscopy as input for finite element models of the prosthesis components. In these models, tibiofemoral contact patterns at the condyles and post-cam articulations were calculated during various activities. To test for feasibility, the technique was applied to a bicruciate posterior-stabilized prosthesis. Sensitivity of the finite element analysis, validation of the technique, and in vivo tests were performed. To test for potential in the clinical setting, five patients were preliminarily analyzed during chair rising-sitting, stair climbing, and step up-down. For each task and patient, the condylar contact points and contact line rotation were calculated. The results were repeatable and consistent with corresponding calculations from traditional fluoroscopic analysis. Specifically, natural knee kinematics, which shows rolling back and screw home, seemed replicated in all motor tasks. Post-cam contact was observed on both the anterior and posterior faces. Anterior contact is limited to flexion angle close to extension; posterior contact occurs in deeper flexion but is dependent on the motor task. The data suggest the proposed technique provides reliable information to analyze post-cam contacts.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)19-28
Number of pages10
JournalClinical Orthopaedics and Related Research
Volume468
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 2010

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine

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