The mental simulation of state/psychological verbs in the adolescent brain

An fMRI study

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

This fMRI study investigated mental simulation of state/psychological and action verbs during adolescence. Sixteen healthy subjects silently read verbs describing a motor scene or not (STIMULUS: motor, state/psychological verbs) and they were explicitly asked to imagine the situation or they performed letter detection preventing them from using simulation (TASK: imagery vs. letter detection). A significant task by stimuli interaction showed that imagery of state/psychological verbs, as compared to action stimuli (controlled by the letter detection) selectively increased activation in the right supramarginal gyrus/rolandic operculum and in the right insula, and decreased activation in the right intraparietal sulcus. We compared these data to those from a group of older participants (Tomasino et al. 2014a). Activation in the left supramarginal gyrus decreased for the latter group (as compared to the present group) for imagery of state/psychological verbs. By contrast, activation in the right superior frontal gyrus decreased for the former group (as compared to the older group) for imagery of state/psychological verbs.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)34-46
Number of pages13
JournalBrain and Cognition
Volume123
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 2018

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Imagery (Psychotherapy)
Parietal Lobe
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Psychology
Brain
Prefrontal Cortex
Healthy Volunteers
Verbs
Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Psychological
Mental Simulation
Imagery
Activation
Letters
Stimulus

Cite this

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title = "The mental simulation of state/psychological verbs in the adolescent brain: An fMRI study",
abstract = "This fMRI study investigated mental simulation of state/psychological and action verbs during adolescence. Sixteen healthy subjects silently read verbs describing a motor scene or not (STIMULUS: motor, state/psychological verbs) and they were explicitly asked to imagine the situation or they performed letter detection preventing them from using simulation (TASK: imagery vs. letter detection). A significant task by stimuli interaction showed that imagery of state/psychological verbs, as compared to action stimuli (controlled by the letter detection) selectively increased activation in the right supramarginal gyrus/rolandic operculum and in the right insula, and decreased activation in the right intraparietal sulcus. We compared these data to those from a group of older participants (Tomasino et al. 2014a). Activation in the left supramarginal gyrus decreased for the latter group (as compared to the present group) for imagery of state/psychological verbs. By contrast, activation in the right superior frontal gyrus decreased for the former group (as compared to the older group) for imagery of state/psychological verbs.",
author = "Barbara Tomasino and Maria Nobile and Marta Re and Monica Bellina and Marco Garzitto and Filippo Arrigoni and Massimo Molteni and Franco Fabbro and Paolo Brambilla",
note = "Copyright {\circledC} 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.",
year = "2018",
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doi = "10.1016/j.bandc.2018.02.010",
language = "English",
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pages = "34--46",
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TY - JOUR

T1 - The mental simulation of state/psychological verbs in the adolescent brain

T2 - An fMRI study

AU - Tomasino, Barbara

AU - Nobile, Maria

AU - Re, Marta

AU - Bellina, Monica

AU - Garzitto, Marco

AU - Arrigoni, Filippo

AU - Molteni, Massimo

AU - Fabbro, Franco

AU - Brambilla, Paolo

N1 - Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

PY - 2018/6

Y1 - 2018/6

N2 - This fMRI study investigated mental simulation of state/psychological and action verbs during adolescence. Sixteen healthy subjects silently read verbs describing a motor scene or not (STIMULUS: motor, state/psychological verbs) and they were explicitly asked to imagine the situation or they performed letter detection preventing them from using simulation (TASK: imagery vs. letter detection). A significant task by stimuli interaction showed that imagery of state/psychological verbs, as compared to action stimuli (controlled by the letter detection) selectively increased activation in the right supramarginal gyrus/rolandic operculum and in the right insula, and decreased activation in the right intraparietal sulcus. We compared these data to those from a group of older participants (Tomasino et al. 2014a). Activation in the left supramarginal gyrus decreased for the latter group (as compared to the present group) for imagery of state/psychological verbs. By contrast, activation in the right superior frontal gyrus decreased for the former group (as compared to the older group) for imagery of state/psychological verbs.

AB - This fMRI study investigated mental simulation of state/psychological and action verbs during adolescence. Sixteen healthy subjects silently read verbs describing a motor scene or not (STIMULUS: motor, state/psychological verbs) and they were explicitly asked to imagine the situation or they performed letter detection preventing them from using simulation (TASK: imagery vs. letter detection). A significant task by stimuli interaction showed that imagery of state/psychological verbs, as compared to action stimuli (controlled by the letter detection) selectively increased activation in the right supramarginal gyrus/rolandic operculum and in the right insula, and decreased activation in the right intraparietal sulcus. We compared these data to those from a group of older participants (Tomasino et al. 2014a). Activation in the left supramarginal gyrus decreased for the latter group (as compared to the present group) for imagery of state/psychological verbs. By contrast, activation in the right superior frontal gyrus decreased for the former group (as compared to the older group) for imagery of state/psychological verbs.

U2 - 10.1016/j.bandc.2018.02.010

DO - 10.1016/j.bandc.2018.02.010

M3 - Article

VL - 123

SP - 34

EP - 46

JO - Brain and Cognition

JF - Brain and Cognition

SN - 0278-2626

ER -