The microenvironment in lymphomas - Dissecting the complex crosstalk between tumor cells and 'by-stander' cells

Richard Rosenquist, Frédéric Davi, Paolo Ghia

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

16 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In lymphomas, it is increasingly apparent that the microenvironment is an essential player not only for lymphoma pathogenesis but also for diseaseprogression and therapy resistance. In recent years, we have begun to understand the complex crosstalk between the neoplastic cells and other immunecells, such as T and NK cells, and stromal cells, as well as the signaling pathways that become aberrantly activated through this dialogue (e.g. B-cellreceptor, Toll-like receptor and NF-kB signaling). In this series of reviews, the intricate interplay between lymphoma cells and 'by-stander' cells will beillustrated in representative lymphoma entities, namely Hodgkin lymphomas, follicular lymphomas, marginal-zone lymphomas, chronic lymphocyticleukemia, and T-cell lymphomas, where the crucial role played by the microenvironment has become particularly evident. Furthermore, important cluesto the pathobiology of lymphomas have emerged from (i) the recognition of pre-malignant conditions, such as monoclonal B-cell lymphocytosis or in situlymphomas, (ii) the identification of microbial and/or auto-antigens that are linked to particular entities, as well as (iii) the established increased riskof lymphomas in certain autoimmune/inflammatory conditions, all critical aspects that will be further elaborated in this thematic issue. Our increasingknowledge of these interactions and associations has finally allowed us to design targeted or immune-mediated strategies to interfere with the lymphomamicroenvironment, thereby opening promising therapeutic avenues on the road to cure for these yet incurable diseases.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1-2
Number of pages2
JournalSeminars in Cancer Biology
Volume24
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014

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Lymphoma
Neoplasms
Lymphocytosis
Follicular Lymphoma
T-Cell Lymphoma
NF-kappa B
Toll-Like Receptors
Stromal Cells
Hodgkin Disease
Natural Killer Cells
B-Lymphocytes
T-Lymphocytes
Antigens
Therapeutics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cancer Research

Cite this

The microenvironment in lymphomas - Dissecting the complex crosstalk between tumor cells and 'by-stander' cells. / Rosenquist, Richard; Davi, Frédéric; Ghia, Paolo.

In: Seminars in Cancer Biology, Vol. 24, 2014, p. 1-2.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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