The mitochondrial aspartate/glutamate carrier AGC1 and calcium homeostasis: Physiological links and abnormalities in autism

Valerio Napolioni, Antonio M. Persico, Vito Porcelli, Luigi Palmieri

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a severe, complex neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by impairments in reciprocal social interaction and communication, and restricted and stereotyped patterns of interests and behaviors. Recent evidence has unveiled an important role for calcium (Ca 2+) signaling in the pathogenesis of ASD. Post-mortem studies of autistic brains have pointed toward abnormalities in mitochondrial function as possible downstream consequences of altered Ca2+ signaling, abnormal synapse formation, and dysreactive immunity. SLC25A12, an ASD susceptibility gene, encodes the Ca2+-regulated mitochondrial aspartate-glutamate carrier, isoform 1 (AGC1). AGC1 is an important component of the malate/aspartate shuttle, a crucial system supporting oxidative phosphorylation and adenosine triphosphate (ATP) production. Here, we review the physiological roles of AGC1, its links to calcium homeostasis, and its involvement in autism pathogenesis.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)83-92
Number of pages10
JournalMolecular Neurobiology
Volume44
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Aug 2011

Keywords

  • Aspartate-glutamate carrier
  • Autism
  • Autistic disorder
  • Calcium signaling
  • Mitochondria
  • SLC25A12

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cellular and Molecular Neuroscience

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'The mitochondrial aspartate/glutamate carrier AGC1 and calcium homeostasis: Physiological links and abnormalities in autism'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this