The molecular basis of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome-related lymphomagenesis

G. Gaidano, D. Capello, A. Carbone

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

65 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS)-related lymphomas consistently display a B-cell phenotype and are histogenetically related to germinal center (GC) or post-GC B cells in the overwhelming majority of cases. The pathogenesis of AIDS-related lymphoma is a multistep process involving factors provided by the host, as well as alterations intrinsic to the tumor clone. Host factors involved in AIDS-related lymphomagenesis include reduced immunosurveillance particularly against Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-infected B cells, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-induced alteration of endothelial functions, B-cell stimulation and selection by antigen, HIV-induced deregulation of several cytokine loops, and possibly the host's genetic background. The molecular pathways of viral infection and lesions of cancer related genes associated with AIDS-related lymphoma vary substantially in different clinicopathologic categories of the disease and highlight the marked degree of biological heterogeneity of these lymphomas. Although the reasons for the heterogeneity of AIDS-related lymphoma are not totally clear, it is generally believed that the host's background selects for which specific molecular pathway of AIDS-related lymphoma is activated in a given patient. (C) 2000 by W.B. Saunders Company.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)431-441
Number of pages11
JournalSeminars in Oncology
Volume27
Issue number4 SUPPL.
Publication statusPublished - 2000

Fingerprint

Lymphoma
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome
B-Lymphocytes
Germinal Center
HIV
Immunologic Monitoring
Neoplasm Genes
Virus Diseases
Human Herpesvirus 4
Clone Cells
Cytokines
Phenotype
Antigens
Neoplasms

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology

Cite this

Gaidano, G., Capello, D., & Carbone, A. (2000). The molecular basis of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome-related lymphomagenesis. Seminars in Oncology, 27(4 SUPPL.), 431-441.

The molecular basis of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome-related lymphomagenesis. / Gaidano, G.; Capello, D.; Carbone, A.

In: Seminars in Oncology, Vol. 27, No. 4 SUPPL., 2000, p. 431-441.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Gaidano, G, Capello, D & Carbone, A 2000, 'The molecular basis of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome-related lymphomagenesis', Seminars in Oncology, vol. 27, no. 4 SUPPL., pp. 431-441.
Gaidano, G. ; Capello, D. ; Carbone, A. / The molecular basis of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome-related lymphomagenesis. In: Seminars in Oncology. 2000 ; Vol. 27, No. 4 SUPPL. pp. 431-441.
@article{de03c87e86a34e9ea6f4d9e99021af79,
title = "The molecular basis of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome-related lymphomagenesis",
abstract = "Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS)-related lymphomas consistently display a B-cell phenotype and are histogenetically related to germinal center (GC) or post-GC B cells in the overwhelming majority of cases. The pathogenesis of AIDS-related lymphoma is a multistep process involving factors provided by the host, as well as alterations intrinsic to the tumor clone. Host factors involved in AIDS-related lymphomagenesis include reduced immunosurveillance particularly against Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-infected B cells, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-induced alteration of endothelial functions, B-cell stimulation and selection by antigen, HIV-induced deregulation of several cytokine loops, and possibly the host's genetic background. The molecular pathways of viral infection and lesions of cancer related genes associated with AIDS-related lymphoma vary substantially in different clinicopathologic categories of the disease and highlight the marked degree of biological heterogeneity of these lymphomas. Although the reasons for the heterogeneity of AIDS-related lymphoma are not totally clear, it is generally believed that the host's background selects for which specific molecular pathway of AIDS-related lymphoma is activated in a given patient. (C) 2000 by W.B. Saunders Company.",
author = "G. Gaidano and D. Capello and A. Carbone",
year = "2000",
language = "English",
volume = "27",
pages = "431--441",
journal = "Seminars in Oncology",
issn = "0093-7754",
publisher = "W.B. Saunders Ltd",
number = "4 SUPPL.",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - The molecular basis of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome-related lymphomagenesis

AU - Gaidano, G.

AU - Capello, D.

AU - Carbone, A.

PY - 2000

Y1 - 2000

N2 - Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS)-related lymphomas consistently display a B-cell phenotype and are histogenetically related to germinal center (GC) or post-GC B cells in the overwhelming majority of cases. The pathogenesis of AIDS-related lymphoma is a multistep process involving factors provided by the host, as well as alterations intrinsic to the tumor clone. Host factors involved in AIDS-related lymphomagenesis include reduced immunosurveillance particularly against Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-infected B cells, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-induced alteration of endothelial functions, B-cell stimulation and selection by antigen, HIV-induced deregulation of several cytokine loops, and possibly the host's genetic background. The molecular pathways of viral infection and lesions of cancer related genes associated with AIDS-related lymphoma vary substantially in different clinicopathologic categories of the disease and highlight the marked degree of biological heterogeneity of these lymphomas. Although the reasons for the heterogeneity of AIDS-related lymphoma are not totally clear, it is generally believed that the host's background selects for which specific molecular pathway of AIDS-related lymphoma is activated in a given patient. (C) 2000 by W.B. Saunders Company.

AB - Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS)-related lymphomas consistently display a B-cell phenotype and are histogenetically related to germinal center (GC) or post-GC B cells in the overwhelming majority of cases. The pathogenesis of AIDS-related lymphoma is a multistep process involving factors provided by the host, as well as alterations intrinsic to the tumor clone. Host factors involved in AIDS-related lymphomagenesis include reduced immunosurveillance particularly against Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-infected B cells, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-induced alteration of endothelial functions, B-cell stimulation and selection by antigen, HIV-induced deregulation of several cytokine loops, and possibly the host's genetic background. The molecular pathways of viral infection and lesions of cancer related genes associated with AIDS-related lymphoma vary substantially in different clinicopathologic categories of the disease and highlight the marked degree of biological heterogeneity of these lymphomas. Although the reasons for the heterogeneity of AIDS-related lymphoma are not totally clear, it is generally believed that the host's background selects for which specific molecular pathway of AIDS-related lymphoma is activated in a given patient. (C) 2000 by W.B. Saunders Company.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0033870774&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0033870774&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

C2 - 10950370

AN - SCOPUS:0033870774

VL - 27

SP - 431

EP - 441

JO - Seminars in Oncology

JF - Seminars in Oncology

SN - 0093-7754

IS - 4 SUPPL.

ER -