The mulligan ankle taping does not affect balance performance in healthy subjects: A prospective, randomized blinded trial

Jose Maria Delfa-De-La-Morena, Isabel Maria Alguacil-Diego, Francisco Molina-Rueda, Maria Ramiro-González, Jorge Hugo Villafañe, Josué Fernández-Carnero

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

[Purpose] The aim of this study was to evaluate the immediate effects of Mulligan fibular taping on static and dynamic postural balance in healthy subjects using computerized dynamic posturography (CDP). [Subjects and Methods] Forty-four volunteers (26 males and 18 females) aged 21 ±2 years participated in the study. The Mulligan tape was applied by a specialist in this technique. The placebo group received a treatment with a similar tape but with several cuts to avoid the fibular repositioning effect produced by Mulligan tape. Main outcome measures: The Sensory Organization Test (SOT) and the Motor Control Test (MCT) were performed by each subject at baseline and after the interventions. Outcome measures included equilibrium and strategy scores from each trial and condition of the SOT, and speed of reaction (latency period) from the MCT. [Results] Mulligan ankle taping did not have an impact on postural control during static and dynamic balance in subjects with healthy ankles when compared with placebo taping. [Conclusion] There was no difference in, equilibrium and strategy (SOT) and speed of reaction (MCT) in any of the subjects in this study. Therefore, this study suggests that Mulligan ankle taping does not have an impact on balance in healthy subjects.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1597-1602
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Physical Therapy Science
Volume27
Issue number5
Publication statusPublished - May 1 2015

Keywords

  • Ankle
  • Balance
  • Dynamic posturography

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation

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