The neural correlates of lexical processing in disorders of consciousness

Anna Nigri, Eleonora Catricalà, Stefania Ferraro, Maria Grazia Bruzzone, Ludovico Ernesto Marsilio D'Incerti, Davide Sattin, Davide Rossi Sebastiano, Silvana Franceschetti, Giorgio Marotta, Riccardo Benti, Matilde Leonardi, Stefano Cappa, Behalf Of Crc - Coma Research Centre Members On Behalf Of Crc - Coma Research Centre Members

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

There is a growing interest in the use of functional imaging to assess brain activity in the absence of behavioural responses in patients with disorders of consciousness (DOC). In the present study, we applied a hierarchical auditory stimulation paradigm to functional magnetic resonance (fMRI) in a group of long-term DOC adult patients. Brain response to pairs of pseudowords, of unrelated words and of semantically related words, i.e. stimuli differing in lexical status (words vs. pseudowords) and semantic relatedness (related vs. unrelated) was assessed. The former contrast was considered to reflect the automatic brain response to the passive presentation of meaningful real words, while the latter aimed to assess the response to meaning relationships. The results of the study indicate that automatic lexical processing can be observed in minimally conscious state (MCS), but also in vegetative state/unresponsive wakefulness syndrome (VS/UWS) patients, as indicated by increase in blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) activity in the linguistic networks. DOC patients, for some task conditions, recruited additional areas in comparison to healthy participants. Furthermore this study provides additional evidence of the potential role of fMRI in the assessment of residual cognitive processing in some of these patients, which may not be evident at the clinical level.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1526-1537
Number of pages12
JournalBrain Imaging and Behavior
Volume11
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2017

Keywords

  • Disorder of consciousness
  • fMRI
  • Lexical processing
  • Minimally conscious state
  • Priming
  • Vegetative state

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging
  • Neurology
  • Clinical Neurology
  • Cognitive Neuroscience
  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Cellular and Molecular Neuroscience
  • Behavioral Neuroscience

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