The neutrophil-lymphocyte ratio and its utilisation for the management of cancer patients in early clinical trials

R. Kumar, E. Geuna, V. Michalarea, M. Guardascione, U. Naumann, D. Lorente, S. B. Kaye, J. S. De Bono

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: Inflammation is critical to the pathogenesis and progression of cancer, with a high neutrophil-lymphocyte ratio (NLR) associated with poor prognosis. The utility of studying NLR in early clinical trials is unknown. Methods: This retrospective study evaluated 1300 patients treated in phase 1 clinical trials between July 2004 and February 2014 at the Royal Marsden Hospital (RMH), UK. Data were collected on patient characteristics and baseline laboratory parameters. Results: The test cohort recruited 300 patients; 53% were female, 35% ECOG 0 and 64% ECOG 1. RMH score was 0-1 in 66% and 2-3 in 34%. The median NLR was 3.08 (IQR 2.06-4.49). Median OS for the NLR quartiles was 10.5 months for quartile-1, 10.3 months for quartile-2, 7.9 months for quartile-3 and 6.5 months for quartile-4 (P10NLR models, with an optimal NLR cutoff of 3.0. Conclusions: NLR is a validated independent prognostic factor for OS in patients treated in phase 1 trials. Combining the NLR with the RMH score improves the discriminating ability for OS.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1157-1165
Number of pages9
JournalBritish Journal of Cancer
Volume112
Issue number7
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 31 2015

Keywords

  • Inflammation
  • Neutrophil-lymphocyte ratio
  • Phase 1 trial
  • Prognostic score
  • RMH score
  • Survival

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cancer Research
  • Oncology

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'The neutrophil-lymphocyte ratio and its utilisation for the management of cancer patients in early clinical trials'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this

    Kumar, R., Geuna, E., Michalarea, V., Guardascione, M., Naumann, U., Lorente, D., Kaye, S. B., & De Bono, J. S. (2015). The neutrophil-lymphocyte ratio and its utilisation for the management of cancer patients in early clinical trials. British Journal of Cancer, 112(7), 1157-1165. https://doi.org/10.1038/bjc.2015.67